Unknown language: zada

< Previous | Next >
  • Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    All translations for زيد or زاد (zada - Arabic):
    - increase
    - grow
    - go up
    - top
    - exceed
    - be higher
    - multiply
    - heighten
    - enhance
    - add

    Arabic translation for "prince":
    - 'amir (أمير)

    Now natives shall help us!
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I am a native speaker of Arabic and would be more than happy to supply answers to your questions! ;)

    I am not aware of the meaning "prince" for the word "zada." The three-letter root of the word is "Z A D," which means "to add." That is why most of the meanings of this word and its derivatives have to do with adding. (Whodunit provided an excellent list!) "Zayd" is a masculine name, and could possibly refer to the name of a prince. Maybe that's where you were confused.

    Or there could just be another meaning I am not aware of...
     

    Betsy Barnicle

    New Member
    USA English
    Thank you all so much for the quick response. I had just been reading a few lists on the internet of the numerous international translations for the title of the book "The Little Prince" or in French "Le Petit Prince." I lost track of the web page where I saw the word "zada" in one of the title translations - I thought it was in an arabic title. I was trying to show where some of the translations include both the word "prince" and "king." I think some languages used the term "little king" to signify "prince." Some of the words ended in "zede" (not "zada").
    I love studying languages.
    Perhaps the "zada" was meant to signify "little" as in "grow up" shown in one of the above replies. Maybe it was translated literally as "The Little Prince who is not grown up," since much of the philosophy of the book revolves around how the Little Prince thinks freely like a child vs. the limited thinking of grown ups.

    Some of the title translation web sites:
    http://www.risc.uni-linz.ac.at/people/hemmecke/lprince/
    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Rhodes/1916/online.html

    Thanks.

    Ok, I found the web page w/the different title translations:
    http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Concorde/6903/collection.html

    Note: under Urdu, "Shehzada" = prince
    (On a translation page I looked up "king" and got "badshah", SO is "shah" = "king"?)

    Under Uzbek, "Shahzoda" = prince
    Under Kyrgyz, "hanzada" = prince
    Under Kazakh, "Shakhzada" = prince

    But because of the word "Shah," (king?), I'm thinking that the suffix "zoda" or "zada" makes it mean "prince." Do you see where I'm trying to go with this? I'm trying to split up the word "Shehzada" or "Shahzoda" or "Shakhzada" into its sub meanings, trying to get the literal translation.

    Any help for that? Thanks?

    Ooops - That web page address is:
    http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Concorde/6903/collection.html

    ...another word (or name) is Scheherazade ending in "zade". What does the first part of the word, "Schehera", mean? "Zade" as a suffix obviously means something when tacked on to a main noun.

    I heard from another site that Shahzada means "son of a king".
     

    Betsy Barnicle

    New Member
    USA English
    That would be in Arabic. But I think the answer I needed for "Shahzada" was the translation of "son of a king," which is a funny way to say "prince" when a language probably has a word directly for "prince." (that is the title translation in several languages, like Urdu, for the book "The Little Prince")
    Thanks
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Betsy Barnicle said:
    That would be in Arabic. But I think the answer I needed for "Shahzada" was the translation of "son of a king," which is a funny way to say "prince" when a language probably has a word directly for "prince." (that is the title translation in several languages, like Urdu, for the book "The Little Prince")
    Thanks
    I only know that the Arabic word شاه (shah) means king, but that "zada" is supposed to mean "son", I don't know!
     

    dayn

    New Member
    Bulgaria and bulgarian
    The verb za:da in arabic means to increase.The root is not Z A D ,but Z Y D.
     

    khwaje

    New Member
    Turkey and Turkish
    I think "shahzada" comes from Persian (Iranian) and used in many languages such as Urdu, Kurdish, Old Turkish etc. For example, it is used in Turkish in the meaning of "son of a sultan". In the Ottoman State, before modern Turkish Republic, sons of the sultans (also called padishahs) were called shahzade. Even today a Turk understands this meaning " a sultan's son". Thanks.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top