unmarried people living together as partners [word?]

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Lusitania

Senior Member
Portugal Portuguese
Is there any expression to define people that live together as a couple but aren't married?

<< Portuguese expression removed. >>


Many thanks

Best
 
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  • Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Lusitania, I think you need to explain what you want a little further. She's looking for a term which describes a legal status granted to people who have lived together for some time, which is similar to marriage, but, for instance, may be appliable to same-sex couples in countries where same-sex marriage is not allowed.
     

    Lusitania

    Senior Member
    Portugal Portuguese
    Yes, It's like a designation such as marriage to describe a non-married couple living together, any union. But cohabitees will do if there isn't any other designation.
     

    petereid

    Senior Member
    english
    "commonlaw" husband/wife only exists legally in Scotland (if I remember correctly) The expression was used regularly in English newspapers, but seems to have disappeared.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    We also have civil partnerships in the UK for gay couples who register their relationship. This registration brings with it pretty much the same rights and responsibilities as a wedding, but we're not supposed to call it a marriage! Straight couples cannot have a Civil Partnership
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    In at least three states in the US there is an equivalent. It is called a civil union. It may include both same sex and mixed sex couples...I'm not sure about the last part. In AE, cohabitee would sound very legalistic, and is not used in ordinary speech.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    We in the U.S. quite often hear of "domestic partners", but that also has an administrative sound to it. I don't think I've ever heard anyone use it in conversation about themselves or their "domestic partner." :)

    In everyday speech, I most commonly hear "they're a couple", or "we're a couple." But that doesn't designate as a permanent relationship.

    Among my gay friends, I've heard "life partner" and "partner for life" as a way to refer to a long-term, long-standing live-in relationship. Once again, though, this does not have any legal status.
     

    Lusitania

    Senior Member
    Portugal Portuguese
    << Portuguese removed. >>

    Many thanks for your help, I will keep cohabitees as it's meant for a training and it's a shorter term and I can explain it then.

    Thanks
     
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    Strider

    Senior Member
    England, English
    There is also the expression 'living in sin'.

    I haven't seen or heard this expression for a few years, though. Do people still use it?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Is there any expression to define people that live together as a couple but aren't married?

    << Portuguese removed. >>

    Many thanks

    Best
    I don't think any of us brought up that "living together" is one of the most common expressions for two people living together as a couple. It doesn't include the meaning of long-term commitment, though, but it is a very common expression. I was re-reading your question and it popped right out of the question. In fact, it's so common that people will avoid saying it to avoid the implication. If two women are sharing a house, for example, for economic reasons but are not romantically involved, we'll say, "They're sharing a house" or "They're splitting the rent"... anything but "They're living together."
     
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    Lusitania

    Senior Member
    Portugal Portuguese
    yes, in english I usually say "people living together as a couple", but I needed some word as we have << Portuguese removed. >>. I'll use the designation "cohabitees" as Sally sugested.

    many thanks to you all
     
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    yes, in english I usually say "people living together as a couple", but I needed some word as we have << Portuguese removed. >>. I'll use the designation "cohabitees" as Sally sugested.

    many thanks to you all
    Your choice is fine. I just want to make sure that we're communicating about "living together", though. I'm not quite sure by what you said that you understood what I said.

    In AE, "living together" means "living together as a couple." The "as a couple" phrase is redundant in AE. Just the two words "living together" imply "as a couple."
     
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    Lusitania

    Senior Member
    Portugal Portuguese
    Well, in Portugal we have two designation << Portuguese removed. >> if living as a couple (meaning as married but without the contract) or << Portuguese removed. >> which means living together but not as a couple. For example, I could like with a friend and we could jointly pay the National Income Taxes as a couple although we are not married or be cohabitees in the sense that we are not a couple.

    I'm not sure if I was clear on this...:confused:
     
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    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    The problem is that those are legal terms, but most of the replies you got were from everyday language. :(
     
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