Unpersuaded

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Sextus

Senior Member
Spanish
I'm writing a paper and have used this word a couple of times. But it just occurred to me to like it up and can't find it. I've found "unconvinced" or "unconverted". But I still think that "unpersuaded" exists. Is it so?
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    That's acceptable to me. "Unconvinced" is, of course, more common. "Unconverted" is more dramatic, perhaps. Certainly it would usually be employed regarding a matter of some significance.

    You could also write "I am not persuaded by your argument" and "I do not find that argument persuasive."
     

    Suehil

    Medemod
    British English
    While it would be immediately understood, it would be better to say 'I am not persuaded...'. As far as I know, 'unpersuaded' does not officially exist.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In that particular sentence, ("I am unpersuaded by your argument") I might prefer "I am not persuaded by your argument", or, as bibliolept says, "I remain unpersuaded by your argument." For some reason, these sound more idiomatic.

    However, there is nothing wrong with "unpersuaded" as a word. Google scholar claims 8,600 citations, some of which are from your own field.
     

    Sextus

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Here is my paragraph; as you'll see, i actually use "remain unpersuaded", which is the expression mentioned by B.:

    "For it could be possible that a therapeutic argument with true premises and a valid form of inference according to the standards of traditional epistemology and logic was regarded as unsound by a given patient, who would thereby remain unpersuaded, and hence uncured. And it might even happen that this patient remained unpersuaded by all the sound arguments on a given topic one could advance."
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Here is my paragraph; as you'll see, i actually use "remain unpersuaded", which is the expression mentioned by B.:

    "For it could be possible that a therapeutic argument with true premises and a valid form of inference according to the standards of traditional epistemology and logic was regarded as unsound by a given patient, who would thereby remain unpersuaded, and hence uncured. And it might even happen that this patient remained unpersuaded by all the sound arguments on a given topic one could advance."
    I think this use is fine. To revise it with something like "who are not persuaded and therefore remain uncured" seems cumbersome.

    (By the way, I think therefore is what you mean, rather than thereby, but I may be wrong.)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    (You might be right about "thereby"; now I'm not sure either.)
    If you used thereby because you want to say 'by this means', I would suggest something like "who would remain unpersuaded by it".

    If you intend to point to the result of the patient's rejection of the argument, therefore is what you want.
     
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