Until/Till tomorrow vs <I><I'll> see you tomorrow

Dupont de Nemours

Senior Member
Spanish - Spain
When I began to study English, ages ago, I don't remember to have heard somebody to say "see you tomorrow" when saying goodbye to other people. The normal expression was "Until tomorrow! or Till tomorrow!" The point is that today what you hear is almost exclusively "see you tomorrow" at least in British English. Are Until tomorrow! or Till tomorrow! out of date expressions ? or Does it depend on the context and the use of colloquial or formal English?
Thanks in advance
 
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  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you are saying farewell to someone you are going to greet again tomorrow (or on some other known day in the very near future), such as when leaving work, then "See you tomorrow" or "See you Monday" are as common now has they have been for the past forty or fifty years, so far as I can tell/remember.

    "Until tomorrow" is certainly far less common now, and sounds faintly old fashioned. This ngram chart is interesting, suggesting "See you tomorrow" became popular in the 1930s but really took off in the 1970s: Google Ngram Viewer
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The Ngram for until/till tomorrow is deceptive. It would include such phrases as "He won't live until tomorrow." I attempted to make it case sensitive but it did not change things as lower case still showed.

    From a purely subjective point of view, I don't recall "Until tomorrow! or Till tomorrow!" being particularly popular.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The Ngram for until/till tomorrow is deceptive. It would include such phrases as "He won't live until tomorrow." I attempted to make it case sensitive but it did not change things as lower case still showed.

    From a purely subjective point of view, I don't recall "Until tomorrow! or Till tomorrow!" being particularly popular.
    I always check to see whether upper and lower case phrases are included. In this case, they were not, so only those beginning with the capital letters (as in search box) are incuded in the results. If you click the "case insensitive" box and search again, you get the resuts you are describing. To see the difference check out this one.
     
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