Up For Grabs & There For The Taking

Discussion in 'Ελληνικά (Greek)' started by plank, May 22, 2011.

  1. plank Member

    Australia
    english
    Up For Grabs - Meaning : If something is up for grabs, it's available for anyone who wants to try to get it.
    &
    There For The Taking or Yours for the Taking Meaning : if something good is yours for the taking, it would be very easy for you to get or achieve She fell on the third lap, just as the gold medal was hers for the taking. If you're interested in the job, it's there for the taking.

    Is there an equivalent Greek idiom to these 2 similar (meaning) English idioms ?

    Also -
    Is there a single Greek word that would describe either or both idioms ?

    I'd appreciate any help.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2011
  2. Eltheza

    Eltheza Senior Member

    Worcestershire, UK
    English - England (Midlands)
    Hi plank!:)

    I think the single Greek word would be διαθέσιμος/η/ο.

    (Hoping to learn some expressions from the native speakers!;))
     
  3. GreekNative Senior Member

    Brussels
    Greek - Greece
    Hmmm... This is a challenging one.

    I don't think that either of the above two expressions have a one-size-fits-all Greek equivalent. But for sure there ARE things you can say to convey the same meaning. That's why I think that after my post other people might come up with more ideas. 'Cause it depends on context, the speaking style of the person, etc.

    Let me start with the above two examples:

    She fell on the third lap, just as the gold medal was hers for the taking: Έπεσε στον τελευταίο γύρο, κι ενώ το χρυσό μετάλιο το είχε στην τσέπη. or Έπεσε στον τελευταίο γύρο, κι ενώ το χρυσό μετάλιο ήταν δικό της.

    If you're interested in the job, it's yours for the taking: Αν σε ενδιαφέρει η συγκεκριμένη δουλειά, είναι δική σου (colloq.: δικιά σου).
    or
    Αν σε ενδιαφέρει η συγκεκριμένη δουλειά, έκλεισε (it's a closed deal / we have a deal).

    "Up for grabs" is a trickier one 'cause it heavily depends on context. The word διαθέσιμος, which Eltheza suggested, is indeed a very good one. As a generic term, though, I'm afraid it wouldn't always sound natural. I've googled "up for grabs", in order to find it in different phrases in English and let me attempt the translation of a few examples:

    - The Home Alone house is up for grabs = Το σπίτι του (or της ταινίας) Home Alone βγαίνει προς πώληση or διατίθεται προς πώληση (the latter sounds a bit more official).
    - Future in Arab region up for grabs = Το μέλλον του Αραβικού κόσμου, πεδίο ανταγωνισμού (meaning that islamists, seculars, the elite, etc, will fight to be the first to establish themselves),
    or
    Αβέβαιο το μέλλον του Αραβικού κόσμου (αβέβαιος = uncertain)
    - Africa: up for grabs = Αφρική: όποιος προλάβει (whoever comes first).
    Or, Αφρική: πωλείται (for sale)
    Here, again, it depends on what the writer means, so the article underneath the title will define the way "Africa: up for grabs" will be translated.
    - Adobe Flash Player 10.1: up for grabs = Adobe Flash Player 10.1: (τώρα) διαθέσιμο (or διαθέσιμο για κατέβασμα)
    - Super Bowl Trip Up for Grabs = κερδίστε ένα (δωρεάν) ταξίδι για το (or τον τελικό του) Super Bowl
    - 15 Senate seats up for grabs = μάχη για 15 έδρες στη Γερουσία
    or
    Επαναληπτικές εκλογές για 15 έδρες στη Γερουσία (again, depending on context)
    - 1988 Apple computer up for grabs at auction = Υπολογιστής της Apple του 1988, (βγαίνει) στο σφυρί (or βγαίνει σε δημοπρασία). Βγαίνω στο σφυρί is an expression mostly used to say that something goes on sale at an auction.

    So, as you see, the context and the subtle nuances one might want to add could make a big difference in the way "up for grabs" is translated.

    At least, that's my take.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2011
  4. plank Member

    Australia
    english
    Thank you both,

    Διαθέσιμος - would apply generally.

    Greek Native - some excellent analysis and you're right it's all about context re: Up for Grabs - όποιος προλάβει is perhaps the overriding theme here.
    Το έχει στην τσέπη , είναι δικό σου (ήταν δικό της) .. both describe there for the taking - and are good translations. Είναι δικό σου .. probably gets the nod here?

    To έχει στην τσέπη .. may have its equivalent in it's in the bag... which may suggest something is almost certain to happen (99% ?)...maybe more so than there for the taking, but I'm not certain if that's also the case in Greek ?
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2011

Share This Page

Loading...