Up to vs till

t1982

New Member
Vietnamese
Could you explain the difference between 'up to' and 'till' when we use it á preposition of time, please.
Thanks a lot
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)

    Nodey

    Member
    English United States
    Could you explain the difference between 'up to' and 'till' when we use it á preposition of time, please.
    Thanks a lot
    Hello T1982,

    The standard version of till is until. If you use it informally, it is spelled 'til.

    When you're talking about time, up to is followed by a general term that covers a span of time. Until is followed by a specific point in time.

    Examples:
    I can wait up to three days for your answer (but I can't wait any longer).
    I can wait until 5:00 for your answer (but I can't wait any longer).

    I hope this was helpful.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hello T1982,

    The standard version of till is until. If you use it informally, it is spelled 'til.
    ...
    I was hoping that people would read the linked threads and that this wouldn't happen.

    The standard version of till is till.
    It is a perfectly good word that has been around since before until came along and may be used at all levels of spoken and written English.

    You will see 'til, but that is generally regarded as a hypercorrection by someone who does not believe that till is a word. They believe that when they hear till it is a contraction of until.

    For a lot more on this topic, which is not the topic of the current thread,
    see what is the difference between TILL and UNTIL?
     

    TheMBSystem

    Member
    Italian
    may be used at all levels of spoken and written English.
    Sorry panjandrum, but the following comes from OXFORD ADVANCED LEARNER'S DICTIONARY:
    Till is generally felt to be more informal than until and is used much less often in writing. At the beginning of a sentence, until is usually used.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Sorry panjandrum, but the following comes from OXFORD ADVANCED LEARNER'S DICTIONARY:
    Till is generally felt to be more informal than until and is used much less often in writing. At the beginning of a sentence, until is usually used.
    I don't think you'll find anything much more formal than the very traditional form of words used in wedding vows:
    to have and to hold
    from this day forward;
    for better, for worse,
    for richer, for poorer,
    in sickness and in health,
    to love and to cherish,
    till death us do part,

    It may be that till is used less often these days, or perhaps less often in some variants of English.
     

    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Hello,

    is it possible to use the preposition TO for saying until what time something takes?

    e.g. I was there to 5 p.m.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    ...is it possible to use the preposition TO for saying until what time something takes?

    e.g. I was there to 5 p.m.
    You can certainly say, in BE, "The shop is open from "9 a.m. to 5 p.m", but using "to" on its own in the way you've tried to do it there doesn't really work.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top