upbeat music

quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
Kelly loves upbeat music because it makes her feel happy.


I'd like to make sure that "upbeat musice" refers to "light, happy music." Correct me if I am wrong. Thanks.
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    adjective
    1 upbeat

    pleasantly (even unrealistically) optimistic
    –adjective 3.optimistic; happy; cheerful:
    I don't think you should limit your definition to "light" music, but happy is correct. It is dangerous to make broad assertions, but in general upbeat music will not have a slow tempo.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    I don't think you should limit your definition to "light" music, but happy is correct. It is dangerous to make broad assertions, but in general upbeat music will not have a slow tempo.
    I'm sorry, but I find it hard to imagine a kind of music that's "optimistic', I wonder.....exactly what kind of music are we talking about here? Music for dancing or.......(after all, you know, it can be very subjective to define a "cheerful" kind of music:):confused:)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I'm sorry, but I find it hard to imagine a kind of music that's "optimistic', I wonder.....exactly what kind of music are we talking about here? Music for dancing or.......(after all, you know, it can be very subjective to define a "cheerful" kind of music:):confused:)
    Generally speaking "upbeat" refers to "tempo" and "mood". "Beat" is another word for "keeping rhythm", "up" means "up tempo", and "optimistic" music is in a tonal system that makes also makes people feel "up" (opposite of down, depressed).

    The concept of tempo is fairly "universal". The reaction to this or that "tonal system" is not quite the same thing, since how we react to different sets of sounds is a matter of nurture as well as nature.

    This is an extremely simplistic explanation. I'm avoiding specific musical terms that would make things much more precise but might not be understood by most people. :)

    Gaer
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Generally speaking "upbeat" refers to "tempo" and "mood". "Beat" is another word for "keeping rhythm", "up" means "up tempo", and "optimistic" music is in a tonal system that makes also makes people feel "up" (opposite of down, depressed).

    The concept of tempo is fairly "universal". The reaction to this or that "tonal system" is not quite the same thing, since how we react to different sets of sounds is a matter of nurture as well as nature.

    This is an extremely simplistic explanation. I'm avoiding specific musical terms that would make things much more precise but might not be understood by most people. :)

    Gaer
    THANK YOU!!!!
    I thought no one wants to answer my question!!!!:mad::D

    I understand that it must be difficult to answer this question due to its own nature......Plus, the example given by the thread starter makes me wonder.....Isn't it a bit xxx to say that "He likes to listen to "up" music because it makes him feel "up":confused::D
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    THANK YOU!!!!
    I thought no one wants to answer my question!!!!:mad::D

    I understand that it must be difficult to answer this question due to its own nature......Plus, the example given by the thread starter makes me wonder.....Isn't it a bit xxx to say that "He likes to listen to "up" music because it makes him feel "up":confused::D
    But that's what it means! You DO listen to "upbeat" music to feel "up" or to get over feeling "down".

    There is a very close expression: "up tempo". This refers to music that is fast or at least lively.

    And something that is "down tempo" is slow or relaxed (but not related to a "down mood".

    I'd like to give you an example of music that you would immediately recognize as "upbeat", but first I would have to know your taste in music, a subject for PMs and not a thread. :)

    Gaer
     
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