uphill, downhill / up, down the road

< Previous | Next >

Antonio

Senior Member
Mexico/Spanish
Hi Group,

When you walk, you say "Is two blocks away, then you walk uphill, and you will see the restaurant on the right hand side". The long for is "up the hill" but you make a reduction form "uphill". Like you said, "The shorter, the better". The same case is apply for "downhill" too.

But what about "up/down the road" you use this phrase when you are inside a car and you're crossing a slope, right?

If am right or If am wrong, please let me know.
 
  • Dorian

    Senior Member
    Canada English
    Antonio said:
    The long for is "up the hill" but you make a reduction form "uphill".
    I don't think uphill is quite the same as up the hill. Up the hill sounds like there is a real hill there, so if you looked at it from a distance you would see a hill. But uphill just means that the road goes up. If you looked at it from a distance you might not see a hill or bump in the land.

    So I would not tell someone to go up the hill unless there was a real hill (small mountain or bump in the land).

    Up/down the road is a little more complicated. It often has nothing to do with the slope. If you stop to ask someone for directions, they might say "continue on down this road". It just means the way they are pointing; it doesn't mean the road goes downhill.

    I used to live on a street called 49th, and the shops were on 41st. When I talked about going to the shops, I said "up to 41st" because the road went slightly uphill. But other people called it "down to 41st", because 41 is less than 49!
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    So, just to understand the question so far. When I get around by foot, I say uphill or downhill and when I get around by car, I use up or down the road. That's right, I agree with you, is just to point direccions. I just wanna know that if I go by foot or by car, which is better to use for the situation.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It doesn't matter how you transport yourself. You can be walking or driving or riding a bike. The terms are the same.

    In San Francisco, there are many steep hills. If there is a shop at the top of a hill, I say, "You need to go up the hill from Van Ness and there you'll find it. It's uphill all the way to the top (meaning that the road is a steep climb)."

    "Then. you'll go down the hill from there to get to the other store at the bottom of that hill."

    "We lived down the road from the High School when I was living at home."
    "The store is up the road (ahead of you) about 2 miles."
     

    Dorian

    Senior Member
    Canada English
    That's right, it doesn't matter if you are in a car or on foot. No difference.

    I bet that if you went to different parts of the U.S. and different parts of Canada, and different parts of the U.K., you would find that every region uses up the road and down the road slightly differently. In other words, Antonio, unless there is a really steep hill you are pointing to, it probably doesn't matter if you say up or down.
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    ok, Thanks Dorian, now I understand, that it doesn't matter and is the same thing. If I say it, in one way or in another, I'II be understood, for sure.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Another colloquial phrase: Over the hill.

    "Happy Birthday Luis. How old are you now?"
    --"I am 56 years old."
    "Wow, you are over the hill." ("Wow, you are old.")

    (Those of you who are reading this, and who are 56 or older, do not take offense. ;) )

    There is a specific number that specifies over the hill. Maybe it's 40, or 50? Can someone recall?
     

    ph-Alex

    Banned
    us
    In San Francisco, there are many steep hills. If there is a shop at the top of a hill, I say, "You need to go up the hill from Van Ness and there you'll find it. It's uphill all the way to the top (meaning that the road is a steep climb)."
     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I love this thread. It has solved my long-held question.

    By the way, can I use go downslope for go downhill, and go upslope for go uphill?

    If yes, which is more common?

    Thank you
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top