Uproarious giggles...

Hello,
I´m not sure about the meaning of the sentence in bold. I understand every word of it, but the meaning escapes me... I get the general sense but I need to know the meaning precisely because of the translation.
Here´s the context:

A: "Well, you must have been embarrassed, sat there."
B: "I pretended I wasn´t. I picked up the phone and had a very long conversation with a dead tone. Acted like I was sure this sort of outrageous, juvenile behaviour is part of any office."
A: "It´s certainly not part of mine. Uproarious giggles are about as heated as we get.

Thank you,
Jana
 
  • gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I am not sure that I could call a giggle uproarious; it is somewhat of a contradiction in terms I think. A giggle is a sort of nervous titter, and never uproarious. I think the author of the phrase is looking for something to describe the response of those in the office, by using exaggeration.
     

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    B. has pretended to be on the phone to someone in order not to get involved in her colleagues' childish behaviour.
    A. responds that in his/her office the nearest thing to childish behaviour is laughing out loud together.

    While a giggle is usually suppressed laughter, it also means harmless fun, as in: we had a bit of a giggle. In an office where everyone is expected to focus on their work there is naturally some conflict between the desire to laugh out loud and the need to suppress the same into a giggle.
     
    Last edited:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It means: in my office any comic behaviour is muted.

    Uproarious and giggles do not usually go together (that pair in itself is meant to give a mildly comic effect). The first is loud and unihibited; giggles are usually quiet and gentle.

    "Heated" is not an obvious choice here either, but evokes an idea of energy bieng expended on comedy (rather than work) in the office. It is not heated with comedy in her office. "As heated as it gets" implies not very heated.
     
    Thank you all,
    I´m quite glad that it´s not a common sentence, so the fault is not in my understanding of standard English. Even if it´s only a little bit clearer to me now, you´ve inspired me a lot, so the mission is completed!
    Thanks,
    Jana
     
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