Urdabi: یکیاں/YakiyaaN

Sheikh_14

Senior Member
English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
Dear Foreros,

My assumption is that the word above is borrowed into dialectal Urdu from Punjabi, however what does yakiyaaN maarnaa/lagaanaa actually mean? Is yakiyaaN even Punjabi or is it just a form of street slang or worse Internet slang? From what I've gathered so far it appears to mean that one is indulging in BS, uttering fibs or behaving disengenously but this is mere conjecture and nothing beyond that. It's used in a very similar manner to chawwaliiyaaN maarnaa which has been addressed in another thread. It is possible that this term is part of the Lahori/Central Punjabi dialect. Nonetheless, as there isn't much material on this matter that I was able to extract online I thought it would be worth asking the august panel assembled here.

In Urdu yakii means waHdat I.e. unity, the state of being one, but this slang loanword has little to nothing to do with the Persian term یک (yak) which means one.

Regards,
Sheikh
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Ramzaan Mubaarak Shaikh SaaHib.

    The word you have in mind is based on the following.

    y_hakk (a perpetrator of the act "y_hakii" (as in "baRaa vaDDaa y_hakk)

    y_hakkii - the actual act itself (os ne/ohne mere naal y_hakkii kiitii e)

    y_hakkiyaaN - the plural of the act

    What does the word mean? (It's a Punjabi word)?

    It's difficult for me to define it. It reminds me about an incident related by a Punjabi and Urdu poet, Khalid Masood when he was asked to explain the meaning of the Punjabi word "chaval". He said, even Punjabis can't explain what a chaval is. But they know one when they see one!:)

    Please ask the moderator to change the title of the language to "Punjabi".
     
    Last edited:

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    It's difficult for me to define it. It reminds me about an incident related by a Punjabi and Urdu poet, Khalid Masood when he was asked to explain the meaning of the Punjabi word "chaval". He said, even Punjabis can't explain what a chaval is. But they know one when they see one!:)
    Having given more thought to your question, a "y_hakk" is a "fraudster" and "y_hakkii" is an act of "fraud". In slang, a y_hakk" can be translated as "fucker".
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    In that case perhaps I ought to write it as یہکیاں and the person who commits such yhakkiyaaN as a یہک. It would be mightily helpful if you could also type the terms in Nasx or Nastaleeq. I came across the same term in an Urdu-Punjabi comedy series based on a rural Chaudhry family that has settled in Lahore. The elder Chaudhry wants his grandson to be straight with him so he says "O puthar yhakkiyaaN nah maar". YhakkiyaaN here and in such contents is identical to the use of porii پوری amongst Punjabiphones which I assume derives from the English story. Porii is used for a concocted story or incredible lie that's difficult to digest. In a similar manner whenever I have come across yhakkiyaaN its used in a manner similar to bakwaas or bull-s***.

    Every time I've heard the term or searched online یکیاں returns the most results. Not sure if that's because people are typing the term wrong or if that is the accepted local variant.

    Whereas a chavval (with a tashdeed) I would define as an airhead, and chavlii (without a tashdeed) airheadedneas. For anyone who watches football an example would be the way Saint Maximun plays in that he attempts to take on all defenders instead of dribbling out of trouble. So putting yourself in a spot of bother for no reason would be a form of chavlii. Cars that have special overhead storage spaces for your sunnies only to find that they have a piece of glass installed there which makes it impossible to make use of that space is another form of chavlii.
     
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