Urdu: دم and دم پخت

teaboy

Senior Member
USA
English
When you are cooking a dish and you put the lid on the pot and let the food cook in its own juices, is the verb for that دم کرنا dam karna?

That is what I've always understood it to mean, but when I look up دم کرنا dam karna in my Ferozeson's dictionary, it is defined as "to blow". Which makes sense given the fact that dam means "breath". But what then is the correct verb for the above cooking method?
 
  • omlick

    Senior Member
    American English
    When you are cooking a dish and you put the lid on the pot and let the food cook in its own juices, is the verb for that دم کرنا dam karna?

    That is what I've always understood it to mean, but when I look up دم کرنا dam karna in my Ferozeson's dictionary, it is defined as "to blow". Which makes sense given the fact that dam means "breath". But what then is the correct verb for the above cooking method?

    From Platts, I got dam denaa

    continuing long; long-lived; elastic;—sharp-edged, well-tempered:—dam denā or de-denā, To give up one's life, to die; to die (for, -par,-pe), be madly in love (with); to impart temper (to, -ko, steel), to temper (steel);—to let (a thing in a pot) simmer or stew over a slow fire:—dam-raftan, s.m. Expiring:—dam ruknā, v.n. To be suffocated; to breathe short or with difficulty:—dam rakhnā, To hold one's peace, to be content with a little:—dam roknā (-), To choke, suffocate, throttle:—dam
    But if you do a sarch on the word "simmer" on Platts online you will get a lot of verbs besides this.
     

    Cilquiestsuens

    Senior Member
    French
    We had a discussion about this recently....

    dam karnaa is to blow (synonym of phuunk maarnaa in its colloquial form) so dam karnaa is mostly used for something else : when someone recites a specific aayat of the Qur'aan or a du3aa and blow on you in order to cure you from a specific disease.

    I don't know for westernized Pakistanis and Indians, but for the majority of Pakistani it is a very common thing, an integral part of their daily life. khaas taur par log apne doodh piite bacho.N ko dam karwaate rahte hai.N to protect them from the evil eye. I even know a baabaa in a village who can cure you from snake and scorpion bites just through this means (believe it or not).

    As for the cooking part you correctly described we use two expressions : dam dena or dam par rakhnaa and one of my favorite dish is the dam pukht (cooked by 'dam' pukht means pakaa hua in Persian) chicken, which is especially cooked this way....
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    The dam used in this phrase is as highlighted in its definition by omlick or as in the last paragraph of cilki's post - the act of seejnaa. Otherwise dam means a lot of different things, like life/spirit or a moment of time etc.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    We had a discussion about this recently....

    dam karnaa is to blow (synonym of phuunk maarnaa in its colloquial form) so dam karnaa is mostly used for something else : when someone recites a specific aayat of the Qur'aan or a du3aa and blow on you in order to cure you from a specific disease.

    I know about this! It is as you say, to blow over someone after an incantation.

    Interestingly, we also use this verb, dam karnaa, and dam denaa for brewing tea! As in: chaae dam kii? = chaae ko dam diyaa? = did you brew the tea?

    As for the cooking part you correctly described we use two expressions : dam dena or dam par rakhnaa and one of my favorite dish is the dam pukht (cooked by 'dam' pukht means pakaa hua in Persian) chicken, which is especially cooked this way....

    For cooking we use it as above. The meaning of dam pukht = steam cooked / steamed; as by closing the lid you allow the steam to do the job.

    Both words from Persian*:
    Verb: دمیدن damiidan = to blow (with the breath, or as the wind); to breathe. [* دم in Arabic = blood!]

    Noun: دم dam = Breath; air; life; scent, fume; breath of an oven; the stewing over a slow fire.

    Verb: پختنpuxtan, To boil, cook. [پخت past stem]

    دم پختdam-puxt = Kind of pulao cooked in steam.

    Of course دم in Urdu has very many meanings and usages. Here is Mir Taqi Mir with his highly evocative use of دم :



    غم رہا جب تك دم میں دم رہا
    دم كے جانے كا نہایت غم رہا

    میر


     
    Last edited:

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Would it be correct to use dam chhoRnaa as well for to blow/breathe out? Based upon the context it can also mean to breathe one's last breath but context is key.
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    Would it be correct to use dam chhoRnaa as well for to blow/breathe out? Based upon the context it can also mean to breathe one's last breath but context is key.

    To me, the deathly overtones of dam chhoRnaa are quite strong and saaNs chhoRnaa feels like a better way of talking about exhaling.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    To me, the deathly overtones of dam chhoRnaa are quite strong and saaNs chhoRnaa feels like a better way of talking about exhaling.
    The usual words are dam jaanaa, dam TuuTnaa and dam toRnaa along with dam chhoRnaa and dam chhoR denaa. Yes, saaNs chhoRnaa is for breathing out.
     
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