Urdu: لڑ لگنا participle

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Spanish
Friends,

I am copying these 2 verses verbatim from the Coke Studio transliteration for the song "Ram Pam". In the song, a woman (always using the plural ہم for herself) says, essentially, that she has found love and that she is relieved.


راتوں سے لڑنے لگیں ہیں تنہائیاں
اب گنگنانے لگی ہیں من کی وادیاں​

My own translation would say: "(I) have struggled with lonely nights / now the wadis of my heart have hummed (i.e. they have been replenished)".

My question: is that highlighted لگیں a typo? Shouldn't it be "لگی", same as in the next verse, as participles follow the adjectival declension, and I see no reason to nasalize there?

Thanks in advance for any help
 
  • MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    It isn't if it matches the pronunciation, but on the other hand it is a typo if it doesn't follow the way it's pronounced.
    Well, I was rather asking if the first sentence as written is grammatically correct.
    I believe a similar situation was discussed here, and my takeaway is, it would not be correct, hence my question.

    (for what it's worth, I listened to that passage several times, and don't perceive any nasalization, but it might be just my untrained ear).
     
    Last edited:

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    @MonsieurGonzalito Your link doesn't work for me, FYI (links just to the forum home page)

    In the first line, I wonder if the subject here is 'تنہائیاں' (this is a noun for me, not an adjective, but pls await a native speaker) and hence the verb لڑنے لگیں agrees with that (i.e. feminine plural).

    But of course the same situation would then hold for the second line, in which case one would also expect لگیں...
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Sorry, @amiramir, this is the link:

    'تنہائیاں' (this is a noun for me, not an adjective
    I think you are correct, direct feminine plural of تنہائی.


    hence the verb لڑنے لگیں agrees with that (i.e. feminine plural)
    My takeaway of the thread I mention is that, although differentiated feminine plural participle forms do exist, they are very seldom used, especially if there are other plural indicators in the verbal phrase.

    If we consider لڑنے لگیں ہیں to be a single verbal phrase, then according to the other thread, it should be لڑنے لگی ہیں because there is already an indication of plural in the phrase, ہیں, and Urdu tries to avoid repeating that plural-indication nasalization.

    Going out on a limb, I could try to break up the verbal phrase and translate something like:
    There are solitudes - starting to fight the nights.
    تنہائیاں ہیں - راتوں سے لڑنے لگیں

    I don't even know if that makes sense, though, or how it would fit in the general meaning of the song.
     

    Frau Moore

    Member
    Deutsch
    If you break the sentence like this - wouldn´t it be : starTED to fight the nights - there ARE solitudes?

    I guess it´s simply raatoN se laRne lagEE haiN tanhaaiyaaN and the ny in lagee is a typo.

    Such kind of lyrics are always full of mistakes, that´s sloppy work, I wouldn´t puzzle my head over it.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I would parse it as 'solitude has started to fight the nights.'

    I guess it´s simply raatoN se laRne lagEE haiN tanhaaiyaaN and the ny in lagee is a typo.

    Such kind of lyrics are always full of mistakes, that´s sloppy work, I wouldn´t puzzle my head over it.
    ^ Agreed.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    (for what it's worth, I listened to that passage several times, and don't perceive any nasalization, but it might be just my untrained ear).
    I'm having a listen right now and I can't hear nasalisation there either. So it's a typo. BTW. you are right about the rest.
     
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