Urdu: apna/apni vs. meri/mera

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Darraptor

Member
English
I know apna/apni means mine/own and mera/meri means my but those meaning mean the same to me. Lets use an example sentence. I want to say I was playing with my cat. I know this sentence is wrong but this is my attempt. Main ne mera billko khelna kiya ta. I is the subject and we add the ne part because play is a transitive verb(I think) and mera billoko refers to my cat. The ko signifies that cat is the indirect object. I really didnt know how to conjugate the verb play so I used its original form khelna and just added the kiya ta to say I was playing. However I was also thinking could I also make this sentence with apna. I was thinking Main ne apna billko kelna kiya ta(I just switched mera with apna) but I know this sounds wrong. I think we don't use ne if we're using apna. Could someone try explaining whether or not each of my sentences are right with the reason and then creating two new sentences using mera and apna respectively?
 
  • Kahaani

    Senior Member
    How come you didn't add ta at the end? I thought adding the ta signifies that its in the past tense (i.e main ne kiya ta)
    MaiN ne khelaa = I played
    MaiN ne khelaa thaa = I had played

    The sentence of your original post: Main ne apna billko kelna kiya ta = I had done my cat playing. You play with your cat so you use billii ke saath instead of billii ko. Furthermore khelnaa is already a verb so there's no need for karnaa, so you should conjugate khelnaa instead and leave out karnaa. Then you could have used either khelaa thaa or just khelaa, both would be fine. And finally you need to know that billii is feminine so you use apnii instead of apnaa. It's quite a difficult sentence.

    Regarding apnaa versus meraa, I've found out it's a bit tricky. When the subject of the sentence is the same person who 'possesses' the object in the sentence, you use apnaa.

    Voh apne kamre meN gayaa = He went into his own room.
    Voh mere kamre men gayaa = He went into my room.

    This means that you mostly use apnaa in sentences when you're speaking about yourself.

    MaiN apnaa panee peetaa hooN = I drink my own water.

    I'm not sure if, and when you'd say MaiN meraa panee peetaa hooN. It does sound a bit strange.
     
    Last edited:

    Darraptor

    Member
    English
    MaiN ne khelaa = I played
    MaiN ne khelaa thaa = I had played

    The sentence of your original post: Main ne apna billko kelna kiya ta = I had done my cat playing. You play with your cat so you use billii ke saath instead of billii ko. Furthermore khelnaa is already a verb so there's no need for karnaa, so you should conjugate khelnaa instead and leave out karnaa. Then you could have used either khelaa thaa or just khelaa, both would be fine. And finally you need to know that billii is feminine so you use apnii instead of apnaa. It's quite a difficult sentence.

    Regarding apnaa versus meraa, I've found out it's a bit tricky. When the subject of the sentence is the same person who 'possesses' the object in the sentence, you use apnaa.

    Voh apne kamre meN gayaa = He went into his own room.
    Voh mere kamre men gayaa = He went into my room.

    This means that you mostly use apnaa in sentences when you're speaking about yourself.

    MaiN apnaa panee peetaa hooN = I drink my own water.

    I'm not sure if, and when you'd say MaiN meraa panee peetaa hooN. It does sound a bit strange.
    Then why do we even need mera if we have apnaa? I also agree that Main meraa panee peetaa hoon sounds strange
     

    tonyspeed

    Senior Member
    English & Creole - Jamaica
    apnaa/apnii/apne are only used when referring to a 1) previously mentioned subject within 2) the same sentence clause. /apnaa/ cannot be used as part of a subject because of rule 1. Therefore, apnii kitaab baRi hai:cross: is wrong. Neither can you say maiN jaantii huuN ki apnii kitaab Gaaib hai:cross: because of rule 2. /apnaa/ can be used in commands because the subject is implicitly defined: i.e apnii kitaab paRho :tick:. The subject /tum/ is implicitly defined. If it does not follow 1 and 2, it is better to use meraa/merii/mere as this is the standard usage.

    I have come across some strange exceptions that make me cringe when I hear it a bit. There is a store in the USA called Apnaa Baazaar. Maybe a native speaker might chime in here.
     
    Last edited:

    Darraptor

    Member
    English
    apnaa/apnii/apne are only used when referring to a 1) previously mentioned subject within 2) the same sentence clause. /apnaa/ cannot be used as part of a subject because of rule 1. Therefore, apnii kitaab baRi hai:cross: is wrong. Neither can you say maiN jaantii huuN ki apnii kitaab Gaaib hai:cross: because of rule 2. /apnaa/ can be used in commands because the subject is implicitly defined: i.e apnii kitaab paRho :tick:. The subject /tum/ is implicitly defined. If it does not follow 1 and 2, it is better to use meraa/merii/mere as this is the standard usage.

    I have come across some strange exceptions that make me cringe when I hear it a bit. There is a store in the USA called Apnaa Baazaar. Maybe a native speaker might chime in here.
    Random question but is it possible for the subject to appear at the end of a sentence? Like for instance Mujhe dost ki zarrorat hai? where zaroorat is the subject. Also I know Apnaa Baazaar I've been there a few times before
     

    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    I have come across some strange exceptions that make me cringe when I hear it a bit. There is a store in the USA called Apnaa Baazaar. Maybe a native speaker might chime in here.
    Here it means "(our/your) Own Market". "apnaa" etymologically means "own", and it still largely retains that sense. There is also the beautiful word "apnaa-pan" - "(the sense of) belonging (together)". And of course, "apnaanaa" - adopt, i.e. making one's own.
     
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