Urdu: Appropriate phrases for births

teaboy

Senior Member
USA
English
So what are some typical phrases for when a baby is born? I seem to recall something about "May he live many years" or something like that. Or was that for birthdays?
 
  • akak

    Senior Member
    USA
    UK, India- English, Urdu, Hindi
    Other than the standard "bahut bahut mubarakbaad" some phrases I've heard

    Allah/khuda usko lambi umar de
    (May God give him/her a long life)

    Allah/khuda use nek aur saaleh banaye
    (May God make him/her righteous and godfearing

    Allah/khuda use apni har barkat se nawaze
    May God bestow his every blessing on him/her
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    These are some of the ways we say it akak!

    Just a small correction, if you don't mind! In Urdu proper, it is 3umr / 'umrعُمْر as there is a sukoon on <meem >.
    3umr / 'umrعُمْر = age / lifespan, while 3umar / 'Umar عُمَر is, as you know, a proper name for boys.

    There is another expression we use:

    اللّہ \ خدا اسے عمرِ خِضْر دے

    Allah/ Xudaa use / ise 3umr-e-xiDhr de.
    [خِضْر = إلياس = Elijah]
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    These are some of the ways we say it akak!

    Just a small correction, if you don't mind! In Urdu proper, it is 3umr / 'umrعُمْر as there is a sukoon on <meem >.
    3umr / 'umrعُمْر = age / lifespan, while 3umar / 'Umar عُمَر is, as you know, a proper name for boys.

    There is another expression we use:

    اللّہ \ خدا اسے عمرِ خِضْر دے

    Allah/ Xudaa use / ise 3umr-e-xiDhr de.
    [خِضْر = إلياس = Elijah]
    Just a personal aside: I love the sayings that use "xiDhr"!

    I just thought of some another:

    <rab kare woh sau saal tak jiye>

    Probably some more variations along these lines. There are a million of them, I'm sure. I just need to stand next to my grandmother next time she see's a kid :)

    Edit: I know "Khizar" is a Methuselah type figure who lived for a long period. Is this true of Biblical Elijah as well?
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Just a personal aside: I love the sayings that use "xiDhr"!

    I just thought of some another:

    <rab kare woh sau saal tak jiye>

    Probably some more variations along these lines. There are a million of them, I'm sure. I just need to stand next to my grandmother next time she see's a kid :)

    Edit: I know "Khizar" is a Methuselah type figure who lived for a long period. Is this true of Biblical Elijah as well?

    sau saal very often become hazaar saal!

    Not sure about this one! Need to check my Bible, but have a feeling this may rather be part of the Islamic tradition according to which he is supposed to have drunk آبِ حَیات - the elixir of life!
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    چشم بد دور
    بری نظر نہ لگے

    Those are the two that come to mind. I feel like I'm always harping about Ruth Laila Shmidt (because I am), but she has a nice chapter about the Persian and Arabic components of Urdu. Come to think of it, so do Rupert Snell and Christopher Shackle. Check out chapters 7 and 8 here.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Yes, these are used all the time! Here is another one:

    خدا \ اللّہ نظر بد سے بچائے
    Xudaa / Allah naZar-e-bad se bachaa'e
     

    teaboy

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    Here in America, people just say, "Congratulations! Awfully cute...Looks like an old man though..";) No poetry here.
     

    akak

    Senior Member
    USA
    UK, India- English, Urdu, Hindi
    These are some of the ways we say it akak!

    Just a small correction, if you don't mind! In Urdu proper, it is 3umr / 'umrعُمْر as there is a sukoon on <meem >.
    3umr / 'umrعُمْر = age / lifespan, while 3umar / 'Umar عُمَر is, as you know, a proper name for boys.

    There is another expression we use:

    اللّہ \ خدا اسے عمرِ خِضْر دے

    Allah/ Xudaa use / ise 3umr-e-xiDhr de.
    [خِضْر = إلياس = Elijah]
    Not at all, I ended up typing it the way I say it, rather than how it is spelled in Urdu. Very few people I know pronounce it strictly as 'umr. :)
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Not at all, I ended up typing it the way I say it, rather than how it is spelled in Urdu. Very few people I know pronounce it strictly as 'umr. :)
    Or fikr, I might add :) Panjabis tend to add a vowel sound between the consonant and vowel where a sukoon would typically go. This is equally true with Sanskrit and Perso/Arabic etymologies.
     

    teaboy

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    Beyond saalgirah mubaarak, I can't recall any other birthday mahaavira. Birthdays just don't seem to be as big a thing in the subcontinent as they are in the west. Am I correct in this?
     
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