Urdu: deta/deti hai vs de jata/jati hai

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truthandreality23

New Member
United States-English and Urdu
What is the difference in saying "deta/deti hai" vs "de jata/jati hai"? Also, what is the best translation of "de jata/jeti hai"? Examples would be most appreciated.
 
  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Roughly speaking, detaa hae translates to "gives" or "is giving" while de jaataa hae to literal 'gives and leaves' that is either normally used in compound verbs, i.e. with another word preceding like "dhokaa denaa" 'to deceive, cheat', but also 'to delude', while "dhokaa de jaanaa" expresses the completeness of this action and a sense of unexpectedness, grief or intensity.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    I found another example of this
    (from the 1955 song "aplam chaplam chap laayii re")

    daGaa dene-vaalaa dekho
    kaisaa daGaa de gayaa!

    Look at the treacherous one
    how he betrayed (me, and left)!
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    "dagaa de gayaa" here can mean any of the two meanings: (1) betrayed (me) and left; (2) expressing the comprehensiveness of the betrayal with an accompanying sense of shock or unexpectedness. Though, for (1), one would usually say something like "dagaa de chalaa gayaa."
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    "dagaa de gayaa" here can mean any of the two meanings: (1) betrayed (me) and left; (2) expressing the comprehensiveness of the betrayal with an accompanying sense of shock or unexpectedness. Though, for (1), one would usually say something like "dagaa de chalaa gayaa."
    As the thread on this occasion bears the title "Urdu", the word in question is daGhaa دغا and not dagaa دگا.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Devanagari original (he keeps using verb + jaanaa)

    दग़ा देने वाला देखो
    कैसा दग़ा दे गया
    छोड़ गया
    याद
    और दिल मेरा ले गया

    Also, I wonder if, for economy as well as consistency, the IIR representation of غ / ग़ should be changed to just "G".
    Because there is neither a dochasmi "he" in Urdu, nor a corresponding "Gh/G" pair that would lend itself to confusion.
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    "dagaa de gayaa" here can mean any of the two meanings: (1) betrayed (me) and left; (2) expressing the comprehensiveness of the betrayal with an accompanying sense of shock or unexpectedness.
    For whatever it's worth, I suspect many speakers of the language in question would perceive a strong sense of semantic continuity between using stem + jaanaa in the sense of "to do something and leave" and in the sense of "to do something completely/..." After all, if you do something and leave, presumably you did it completely before leaving!

    (This may be what @MonsieurGonzalito had in mind when he put "and left" in parentheses in post #3...?)

    In any case, this doesn't obviate the translator's need to choose one or the other meaning when translating into English. Unless there's a clever way of getting both that I'm not thinking of... :)
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Apologies for transcription habits that are different from yours: in any case, I think, @MonsieurGonzalito jii would have understood.
    Learners of Urdu might have learnt a wrong word; the fact remains that the Urdu word is daGhaa دغا with the Greek gamma sound instead of *dagaa with the "g" of "gaanaa".
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Learners of Urdu might have learnt a wrong word; the fact remains that the Urdu word is daGhaa دغا with the Greek gamma sound instead of *dagaa with the "g" of "gaanaa".

    Yes, yes, I completely agree with you, @marrish jii. I was answering to post 6, whose intention, if it was to correct me or not, was difficult to decipher.
     
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