Urdu, Hindi: barxudaan

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MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

In the Hindi movie "Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani", at some point Ranbir Kapoor and Madhuri Dixit engage in some sort of amorous Urdu poetry duel.
Madhuri Dixit makes an item number as an exotic dancer, but before that, they taunt each other about their loving experience and ability.

At some point in the duel, she says:
barxudaan, husn kaa mazaaq na uRaa!

Per the lyrics sites it would be some sort of honorific ("Gentleman, don't make fun of beauty!"), but I can't find any corroborating dictionary entry.

What is barxudaan?
(there seems to be a Persian barxurdaar)

[This happens before the song "Ghagra", there is a Youtube video, at 0:49]

Thanks in advance
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I have not watched the film, but it may well be "barkhurdaar" rather, a heavily used word in Hindi and Urdu.

    From Platts:

    bar-ḵẖẉurdār, adj. & s.m. Prosperous, successful, happy, enjoying long life and prosperity; blessed with a family of sons; — male issue, son, child.

    In the context of your dialogue, it would mean the woman saying "laddie, boy" to the man. I am assuming that the woman must be of much more age and a certain proud demeanour in order to be able to address the man like this.

    You may be interested in this thread as well.
     
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    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    MonsieurGonzalito said:
    What is barxudaan?
    ...
    And according to the thread you provided, the -n ending seems to be possible as well.
    The word is pronounced with an "r" in the context you have provided. However, the خ - x is not properly pronounced. The other thread doesn't seem to indicate anywhere that an -n ending is possible as well.

    Relevant entries in Urdu Lughat: برخوردار -
    1, 2, 3
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    The word is pronounced with an "r" in the context you have provided. However, the خ - x is not properly pronounced. The other thread doesn't seem to indicate anywhere that an -n ending is possible as well.
    Yes, the -x- sound is totally missing, and, with some good will, the end sound can also be an -n
    Thanks @Alfaaz
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    @MonsieurGonzalito: FWIW, I also had a listen to the video, and I also hear Madhuri Dixit saying barkhurdaar with a final -r rather than -n. The -n that shows up in the other thread was in the context of the Persian verb برخوردن. The Persian infinitive suffix -an (not -aan) gets dropped and the suffix -aar gets added to form the noun that's been loaned into Hindi-Urdu.
     
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