Urdu, Hindi: chhuuTnaa- to have missed and to exude

Sheikh_14

Senior Member
English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
Dear Foreros,

I opened this thread just to make sure I was internally processing these concepts correctly in my head. It is clear to me that chhuTnaa can mean a plethora of things for instance if you let something go I.e. miss it be it an opportunity or your train the term we use is chhuuTnaa. However, what isnt clear to me is as follows:

When someone misses a bus we say- Us kii bus chhuT ga'ii. However can we say woh bus chhuT gayaa? The latter sounds rather odd and I'm interested in finding out how you could express missing something as opposed to having missed it.

If not how would you express the following:

He misses his bus on a daily basis?

Would it be a) "woh roz roz bus ChuuTtaa hai" or b) the more commonly used us kii bus roz roz chuuTtii hai.

In order words can you miss something when it comes to chhuuTnaa or must it be missed? Would you instead have to opt for chhoRnaa in the case above to mean he misses his bus rather than his bus is missed on a daily basis? Would it instead be woh roz roz bus chhoR aataa hai?

I ask the above as I want to properly express that someone is prone to missing opportunities which is akin to missing a train or a bus. If I were to say woh "Mawaaqe/mauqe chhuuTne waaloN meN se hai" would that come off to you as someone who is about to miss an opportunity or someone who finds him/herself amongst those who miss out? The English term here is a "misser". Would it instead have to be Mauqe/mawaaqe chhuuTne dene waaloN meN se or is that being too redundantly pedantic?

Similarly when it comes to sweating and exuding sweat it is clear that if you've already sweated the term we use is paseenaa chhuTnaa however, what if you wanted to express that someone was actively sweating or had a tendency to sweat profusely?

For instance, He sweated is quite simply us kaa paseenaa chhuuTaa taa. However, can you say woh paseenaa chhuuTtaa hai jagah jagah when it comes to sweating everywhere 😅. Or would you instead have to opt for the much more cumbersome alternative in that us kaa paseenaa chhuuTtaa hai jagah jagah? If chhuuTnaa cannot be used as an active verb can chhoRnaa be used instead? As in "paseenaa chhoRnaa"? What I don't quite get is why must your sweat exude rather than for you to sweat or is that just a linguistic principle?

I would massively appreciate your help with regard to the above. It's an easier query to deal with than usual, but one that is nonetheless confounding the OP.

Regards,
Sheikh
 
  • amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I'd like to append a question to the above please if I may.

    I think I have seen (uski? usko?) muskuraahat chhut gayee as well. Does this imply something different to vo muskaraayaa? Maybe something like 'A smile came across his face'.. but I'm guessing. Thank you.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    However can we say woh bus chhuT gayaa?
    No.
    If not how would you express the following:

    He misses his bus on a daily basis?
    us kii bas roz chhuuT jaatii hai.
    In order words can you miss something when it comes to chhuuTnaa or must it be missed?
    One does not deliberately "miss" something, it's out of one's control. So, something must be missed. The English "to miss something" is used in a double sense: one, when someone feels a lack of someone or something (e.g., a toy one was fond of); and two, in the context you have asked about, when you are unable to catch someone or something on time. English confounds these two very different situations, Hindi doesn't.
    Would you instead have to opt for chhoRnaa in the case above to mean he misses his bus rather than his bus is missed on a daily basis? Would it instead be woh roz roz bus chhoR aataa hai?
    No, that would mean something completely different. It would be deliberate. Plus "chhoR aanaa" is something even more different than "chhoRnaa" itself! "chhoR aanaa" is used in the sense to escort, accompany someone to somewhere.
    I ask the above as I want to properly express that someone is prone to missing opportunities which is akin to missing a train or a bus. If I were to say woh "Mawaaqe/mauqe chhuuTne waaloN meN se hai" would that come off to you as someone who is about to miss an opportunity or someone who finds him/herself amongst those who miss out?
    In this case, you can say "mauke chhoRne vaaloN meN se hai" simply because you are describing someone who is defined as a "loser": the fault is implied to lie with the person to some extent. In case you do not want to put any implied blame, then a native speaker would recast the sentence completely as in "voh baRaa badnaseeb hai, baar-baar haath se maukaa nikal jaataa hai."
    Similarly when it comes to sweating and exuding sweat it is clear that if you've already sweated the term we use is paseenaa chhuTnaa however, what if you wanted to express that someone was actively sweating or had a tendency to sweat profusely?

    For instance, He sweated is quite simply us kaa paseenaa chhuuTaa taa.
    Your understanding of "pasiinaa chhuTnaa" is wrong. "pasiinaa chhuuTnaa" is used for a certain sweating: when one is afraid, in panic, etc. In fact, "us ke to pasiine chhuT gaye/paRe" is in itself a quite expressive sentence. The neutral term for sweating is "pasiinaa aanaa."
    However, can you say woh paseenaa chhuuTtaa hai jagah jagah when it comes to sweating everywhere 😅.
    No. He may do this rather: "voh jagah-jagah paad chhoRtaa hai" - even though farting is again not in control of a person, but society often blames one for farting, hence again the usage of "chhoRnaa" to imply blame. Of course, one can always make it even more direct: "voh jagah-jagah paadtaa hai."

    I think I have seen (uski? usko?) muskuraahat chhut gayee as well.
    I have never heard or seen such a sentence in my life: are you sure you've heard or seen such a sentence somewhere? It wouldn't mean anything. For an involuntary, unexpected laugh (not smile, though), you would say "us kii haNsii nikal paRii."
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    So, for example, in:

    ab jaan luT jaae, yah jahaan chhuT jaae,
    saNg pyaar rahe, maiN rahuuN na rahuuN

    [from Sajdaa in the movie "My Name is Khan"]

    Is me leaving the world, the world giving up on me, or the world simply "being let go"?
    Doesn't it, in either case, indicate certain volition, certain willingness, rather than something that happens beyonds one's (or the world's) control?
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    amiramir wrote:
    I think I have seen (uski? usko?) muskuraahat chhut gayee as well.

    I have never heard or seen such a sentence in my life: are you sure you've heard or seen such a sentence somewhere? It wouldn't mean anything. For an involuntary, unexpected laugh (not smile, though), you would say "us kii haNsii nikal paRii."
    I looked back to where I saw it. Here it is:

    "Pakkaa nahiiN hasoge?" kehkar iske daddy ne amit ko gudgudii karnaa shuruu kar diya.

    Is par Amit ki muskuraahat chhuut gaii.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    So, for example, in:

    ab jaan luT jaae, yah jahaan chhuT jaae,
    saNg pyaar rahe, maiN rahuuN na rahuuN

    [from Sajdaa in the movie "My Name is Khan"]

    Is me leaving the world, the world giving up on me, or the world simply "being let go"?
    Doesn't it, in either case, indicate certain volition, certain willingness, rather than something that happens beyonds one's (or the world's) control?

    The song is about love: and love is of course beyond one's control in Hindi language (and I would say in reality, too). Everything is out of control for the lover in the song you quote from: the song's very beginning says "ham se ham hii chhin gaye haiN" if lyrics on Internet websites are accurate (I haven't bothered to listen to the song).

    There is a certain volition, you could say if you stretch a point, for letting oneself sink in this state of helplessness called love, but that's not the same volition as in "laRke ne laRkii ko chhoR diyaa."

    I looked back to where I saw it. Here it is:

    "Pakkaa nahiiN hasoge?" kehkar iske daddy ne amit ko gudgudii karnaa shuruu kar diya.

    Is par Amit ki muskuraahat chhuut gaii.

    Hmm, yes, in your example, it does mean something like a smile broke out on Amit's face (even though he didn't want to or he was resisting). But it's still a weird way to say it: I don't think many native speakers will use "chhuuT" (note: it's not "chhuut," which can have grim meanings) in this way.
     
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