Urdu, Hindi: jaa, chalaa verbal roots used to convey immediate future?

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MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

In the ghazal "Tum Itna Jo Muskura Rahe Ho", (sung by Jagjit Singh in the 1983 movie "Arth"), I would like to know if "jaa" and "chalaa" are being used equivalently in their respective lines

ban jaaemNge zahar piite piite / ye ashk jo pie jaa rahe ho
or
jin zaxmeN ko vaqt bhar chalaa hai / tum kyuuN unheN cheRe jaa rahe ho

This grammar point might be so obvious, that I can't find it spelled out in properly :) .

Do those "chalaa" and "jaa" both convey an idea of immediate future?
i.e:
"if you are going to keep drinking them (the tears)",
"time is going to restore (the wounds) / why you are going to keep opening them"


Could I perhaps have switched both verbs, with the same result?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    بن جائیں گے زہر پیتے پیتے
    یہ اشک جو پیتے جا رہے ہو

    جن زخموں کو وقت بھر چلا ہے
    تم کیوں انہیں چھیڑے جا رہے ہو

    کیفی اعظمی

    ban jaa'eN ge zahr piite piite
    yeh ashk jo piite jaa rahe ho

    jin zaxmoN ko waqt bhar chalaa hai
    tum kyuuN unheN chheRe jaa rahe ho


    Kaifi Azimi

    piite jaa rahe ho - are continuing to drink/suppress/etc.
    chheRe jaa rahe ho - are continuing to touch/irritate/etc.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Also, "chalaa" does convey future, rather than ongoing-ness?
    i.e.:

    jin zaxmoN ko waqt bhar chalaa hai
    tum kyuuN unheN chheRe jaa rahe ho

    the wounds that time is going to restore / why did you keep irritating?
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Also, "chalaa" does convey future, rather than ongoing-ness?
    i.e.:

    jin zaxmoN ko waqt bhar chalaa hai
    tum kyuuN unheN chheRe jaa rahe ho

    the wounds that time is going to restore / why did you keep irritating?
    No.

    the wounds that time has healed / why are you keeping on teasing them

    You can imagine "chukaa" here instead of "chalaa", if with the latter you have trouble understanding the verse. Usage of "chalaa" instead of "chukaa" gives an additional nuance that time has marched on.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    I am sorry, but there is one thing that I still don't understand.
    In all the responses, there seems to be no difference between:

    [imperfective participle] + jaa + [participle of rahnaa] + [conjugated honaa]

    and

    [perfective participle] + jaa + [participle of rahnaa] + [conjugated honaa]

    What would be the difference, for example, between:

    chheRe jaa rahe ho
    and
    chheRte jaa rahe ho

    if there is any?



     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    What would be the difference, for example, between:

    chheRe jaa rahe ho
    and
    chheRte jaa rahe ho

    if there is any?
    No difference for all practical purposes. There is a bit of difference in nuance, but they can still be interchangeable mostly. The first doesn't tell if each of the attempts to "chheRnaa" was achieved/completed or not.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    MonsieurGonzalito said:
    I can't help notice that one is imperfective and the other perfective
    So this works in a perfective sense as well, i.e:
    "you have continued to irritate ..."?
    Below is an attempt to illustrate different possibilities. It should be noted that the basic English translations do not always convey certain nuances (for example, between the aanaa and jaanaa versions - *explained in parentheses).

    karte jaa/aa rahe the - had kept/been (regularly, continuously, habitually, etc.) doing

    • karte ga'e/aa'e the - had kept/been (regularly, continuously, habitually, etc.) doing
    karte aa rahe ho/haiN - have kept/been doing *(from a certain time until now)
    • karte aa'e ho/haiN - have kept/been doing *(from a certain time until now)
    karte jaa rahe ho/haiN - are continuing to do
    • karte ga'e/rahe ho/haiN - have kept doing
    karte jaate ho/haiN - continue to do

    karte jaa'o/jaa'eN ge - will continue doing

    MonsieurGonzalito said:
    Also, "chalaa" does convey future, rather than ongoing-ness?
    No. Another example:

    جو ہم پہ گزری سو گزری مگر شبِ ہجراں
    ہمارے اشک تری عاقبت سنوار چلے

    فیض احمد فیض
     
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