Urdu, Hindi - New trend (?) where yih and vuh not declined to is and us

Qureshpor

Senior Member
Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
Friends,

I have noticed on both Pakistani and Indian channels presenters and others not declining yih to is and vuh to us. I have heard plenty of such cases on Pakistani TV channels but haven't written any examples down. Just now I heard one of the sports presenters on an Indian channel utter the following sentence..

aap pure cricketing logic se dekheN vuh catch ne match aap ke haath se nikaal diyaa

Have you come across this trend? Is this new or has it been going on for a long time?
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Just now I heard one of the sports presenters on an Indian channel utter the following sentence..

    aap pure cricketing logic se dekheN vuh catch ne match aap ke haath se nikaal diyaa

    Was the sports presenter a native Hindi speaker? Lots of presenters and ex-cricketers do not have Hindi as their mother tongue, yet show up on Hindi news channels (and even Hindi commentary).

    Have you come across this trend? Is this new or has it been going on for a long time?

    I have not noticed anything trending like this in Hindi. One can always find some speakers speaking like that, but I don't recognise any trend per se, at least as far as Hindi is concerned. I too have heard it more often in Urdu broadcasts.
     

    RustyHindi

    New Member
    India - Hindi
    I've noticed my parents (who are educated native speakers from Northern India) and friends do this but I always just assumed that it was just a big city thing. Didn't realise that the news channels, which tend to use more formal language, were doing this too!
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I've noticed my parents (who are educated native speakers from Northern India) and friends do this but I always just assumed that it was just a big city thing. Didn't realise that the news channels, which tend to use more formal language, were doing this too!
    Thank you@RustyHindi confirming my observations.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Didn't realise that the news channels, which tend to use more formal language, were doing this too!
    Hindi news channels use a very vulgarised, street language, rather than "formal" language: their language is an endless repeat of "duudh kaa duudh aur paanii kaa paanii."

    By the way, @RustyHindi, given that you say you are from Mumbai, have your parents also lived long enough there to be influenced by bambaiiyaa Hindi? They may be native speakers but at the same time may have lived in a different linguistic environment for many years now: as you know, Mumbai is not a native Hindi speakers' region.

    @Qureshpor jii, you have not yet answered the question about the presenter in question. Or do you not remember his name?
     

    Pokeflute

    Senior Member
    English - American
    For another data point (if anyone is curious at hearing this), the comedian Kunal Kamra (from Mumbai as well) says things like "vo paheliyon ka kuch kaam thaa".

    I'd be curious if this were a more widespread phenomenon - my understanding is that this is particular to a few varieties of Hindustani due to influence from other languages (as Littlepond notes - Mumbai historically was not Hindi speaking, and IIRC many Pakistanis speak Punjabi as a home language).

    Gujarati pronouns (as an example language) don't really have a consistent oblique form in the same way Hindustani ones do. (e.g. "e" (vo) + "nuN" (kaa) = "enuN" (uskaa)).

    But that's mostly speculation on my part.
     
    • Thank you!
    Reactions: Dib

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    For another data point (if anyone is curious at hearing this), the comedian Kunal Kamra (from Mumbai as well) says things like "vo paheliyon ka kuch kaam thaa".

    In addition to living in Mumbai, from my understanding, Kamra is a Khatri, thus the family may originally be hailing from Punjab region.
     
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