Urdu/Hindi: Palle paRnaa

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Sheikh_14

Senior Member
English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
Dear Foreros,

Whilst it is most certainly clear that palle paRnaa means to comprehend but how has it come to being? Platt's has this to say: H پلا पल्ला pallā [P. palla; S.पल+कः; पल्य, &c. rt. पल्; and पल्लव], s.m. Space, distance, reach, range (of a gun, &c.); a measure of capacity; a grain-bag, sack; burden (carried on the head or back), a weight of three maunds; side, protection, assistance (e.g. ḥākim uske palle-par hai); side, edge (of a garment, &c.), border; a sheet (generally applied to chintz or shaw); one of a pair of scales; one blade of a pair of shears, &c.; one shutter or fold (of a door); labium vulvœ:—

I would love to hear your input on this matter, to understand the etymological sense in its most in vogue connotation. Is it to bring something in your cognition range or rather in your balance's scale?

Best Regards,
Sheikh
 
  • Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    No it is not, unfortunately Marrish SaaHib. Any Urdu speaker would understand what it means as the opening post suggests, I am merely interested here in the imagery at play.
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    That's quite surprising you even hear it in Bollywood films never-mind the Urdu-Hindi divide in instances like the following "yeh baat mere palle nahiiN paR rahii ke aisaa howaa kaise" etc. That was just an example sentence and not a quote from a Bollywood film, a phrase however, with palle nahiiN paR rahaa was used in the film jab tak Hai jaan (quite recent) by the character akira.
     

    mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    That's quite surprising ...
    I'm surprised too. I've heard it. You have the right meaning in mind, and your explanation in the OP sounds plausible. Here's the definition given in a Hindi dictionary.

    palle paRnaa - to be familiar (e.g. a topic), to be understood by, to be married (women usage); ke palle paRnaa - to come into the keeping of, to be condemned to possess, to fall into the lot of.
     
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    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    That's quite surprising you even hear it in Bollywood films never-mind the Urdu-Hindi divide in instances like the following "yeh baat mere palle nahiiN paR rahii ke aisaa howaa kaise" etc.
    Ah sorry, my bad; my mind was elsewhere! Of course, in my family itself, we use "palle paRnaa" in sentences like "us ke baat palle hii nahiN paR rahii!"

    I think my mind was in the zone of "allii-pallii" (allii taraf, pallii taraf - this side, that side), etc.
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Uski baat mere palle hi nhi parh rhi. = I'm not getting his/her point.
    Uske baat palle hi nhi parh rhi. = He/She is not getting the point.

    I suspect this "uske" is colloquial/dialect, I'm not sure but I hear it said.


    Otherwise you are right, desi4life, that "baat" is fefinine (probably because women are too fond of talking:D) and it is "uski baat" when "uski" is possessive.
     
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    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Entries in Feroz-ul-Lughaat: here.
    Englishmypassion said:
    Uski baat mere palle hi nhi parh rhi. = I'm not getting his point.
    Uske baat palle hi nhi parh rhi. = He/She is not getting the point.

    I suspect this "uske" is colloquial/dialect, I'm not sure but I hear it said.
    It appears uske (masculine) is being used to describe palla, which is also masculine. The word order could be changed to make this clear: baat uske palle hii nahiiN paR rahii.
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    So pallaa alone appears to mean reach/range according to Platts so perhaps pale paRnaa means to finally fall within your mental/intellectual reach? It can also mean one dish of a pair of scales, so perhaps to finally rest upon your psyche's scale, and thereby within your aptitude of comprehension. In either case, usage of the term appears to be figurative.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    So pallaa alone appears to mean reach/range according to Platts so perhaps pale paRnaa means to finally fall within your mental/intellectual reach? It can also mean one dish of a pair of scales, so perhaps to finally rest upon your psyche's scale, and thereby within your aptitude of comprehension. In either case, usage of the term appears to be figurative.
    It seems, a "pallaa" is same as a "palluu". In Urdu LuGhat "palle paRnaa" has three basic meanings.

    Urdu Lughat

    1. milnaa, Haasil honaa, Hisse meN aanaa, haath lagnaa

    e.g din bhar kii shadiid miHnat ke ba3d shaam ko ujrat meN ek ek rupaiyah palle paRaa

    2. zaujiyyat meN aanaa [shaadii honaa]

    e.g Man Sukhii, baRii bhaagii hai, jo tujh se nir-dhan ke palle paRii

    3. zimme 3aa'id honaa

    e.g us kii vahii liyaaqateN is bhaarii zimmah-daarii ke ham-pallah thiiN jo us ke palle aa paRii thiiN

    See also palle bandhnaa/baandhnaa

    Nowdays one often hears something like..

    us kii ek bhii baat mere palle nah paRii implying I could n't follow/understand anything he said.
     
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