Urdu, Hindi, Persian, Dari: "Kind words"

Sheikh_14

Senior Member
English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
Dear Foreros,

I was at a complete loss when attempting to formulate a term for kind words. How would you go about describing the following in the languages above?:

"Your kind words have given me great resolve and strength".

Your assistance would be much appreciated, and do transliterate where possible so that the pronunciation can be properly deciphered.

Regards,
Sheikh
 
  • Happu

    Senior Member
    German
    I'll give it a try in quite formal, Sanskrit-influenced Hindi, as one might use in an address/speech/formal communication:

    आपकी प्रशस्ति के द्वारा मुझ में बृहत् संकल्प एवं शक्ति उत्पन्न हो गये = aapkii praśasti ke dvaaraa mujh meN bRihat saNkalp evaM śakti utpann ho gaye.

    To stay consistent, all words are Sanskrit-derived, no Urdu word is used. I think it gives the sentence a good flow. But may a native speaker chime in.
     
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    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    I'll give it a try in quite formal, Sanskrit-influenced Hindi, as one might use in an address/speech/formal communication:

    आपकी प्रशस्ति के द्वारा मुझ में बृहत् संकल्प एवं शक्ति उत्पन्न हो गये = aapkii praśasti ke dvaaraa mujh meN bRihat saNkalp evaM śakti utpann ho gaye.

    To stay consistent, all words are Sanskrit-derived, no Urdu word is used. I think it gives the sentence a good flow.
    It's a "solid" sentence, @Happu jii! I might have opted for just hue at the end instead of ho gaye, but that could just be me.

    [That being said, I do often wonder what the point of this type of language use is. Is the point widely understandable communication? That is unequivocally not accomplished by this type of language use. Is the point purity, where "purity" is defined as "Sanskritness"? to sanskrit bolo na! bechaarii hindii ko yuuN bad-Suurat aur abuujh karne kaa kyaa matlab huaa? Anyway, that's just what I find myself thinking when I encounter this type of language use :) I know that my thinking this won't stop people (and governments) from doing it, and there's no reason that my sense of aesthetics needs to be universal.]

    Your kind words have given me great resolve and strength
    My two cents would be to use the word ri3aayat, which feels appropriate for humbly expressing that your interlocutor may have acted "overly" kindly. Here are two possible sentences:

    aapke ri3aayat-bhare shabdoN ne meraa HauSlaa/h baRhaayaa hai.
    aapkii ri3aayat ne meraa DhaaR(h)as baandhaa hai.
     

    Happu

    Senior Member
    German
    [That being said, I do often wonder what the point of this type of language use is. Is the point widely understandable communication? That is unequivocally not accomplished by this type of language use. Is the point purity, where "purity" is defined as "Sanskritness"? to sanskrit bolo na! ...............
    My two cents would be to use the word ri3aayat, which feels appropriate for humbly expressing that your interlocutor may have acted "overly" kindly. Here are two possible sentences:

    aapke ri3aayat-bhare shabdoN ne meraa HauSlaa/h baRhaayaa hai.
    aapkii ri3aayat ne meraa DhaaR(h)as baandhaa hai.

    Well, to me elegant language is a joy to the ears, be it heavily based on Sanskrit or on Urdu (the latter I'm much less adept in). It's like eating in 5-star place vs. grabbing a pav bhaji from the roadside; or putting on nice clothes to a party, whereas theoretically one could just bumble in in rubber chappals wearing a कौपीन.

    Imagine Modi-ji gave a speech in full-blown tapori Hindi - I'm sure it would be quite entertaining, but at the same time he would lower himself in the public's eye and also disrespect his audience. There are occasions when refined language is appropriate.

    Having said said, I also enjoy tapori Hindi - it's a matter of where, when and with whom.

    And of course, there's a broad middle ground.
     
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    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    Well, to me elegant language is a joy to the ears, be it heavily based on Sanskrit or on Urdu (the latter I'm much less adept in). It's like eating in 5-star place vs. grabbing a pav bhaji from the roadside; or putting on nice clothes to a party, whereas theoretically one could just bumble in in rubber chappals wearing a कौपीन.

    Imagine Modi-ji gave a speech in full-blown tapori Hindi - I'm sure it would be quite entertaining, but at the same time he would lower himself in the public's eye and also disrespect his audience. There are occasions when refined language is appropriate.

    Having said said, I also enjoy tapori Hindi - it's a matter of where, when and with whom.

    And of course, there's a broad middle ground.

    I think the broad middle ground is what most people use. Even in formal, Sanskrit-influenced Hindi, some Perso-Arabic words can be found (In my view, calling them Persian or Perso-Arabic words is more linguistically accurate than calling them “Urdu” words, as many are used in Hindi and other Indic languages, and not just confined to Urdu. Though some do call them Urdu words, that’s more from a socio-cultural perspective rather than linguistic).
     
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