Urdu/Hindi/Punjabi: aar paar and related words

Qureshpor

Senior Member
Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
"aar paar" normally means "across" when one is talking about one dimensional concept such as the width of a river or "through" when we have a three dimensional body in mind.

In theory therefore, this side of a river is "aar" and the far side is "paar". However one often hears "is paar" and "us paar"! Why?

Perhaps related or linked to paar is "pare" which in Punjabi is "paraaN". The opposite is "uraaN". Also there is the word "parlaa" for which in Punjabi there is a counterpart "urlaa". What are the equivalents for "uraaN" and "urlaa" in Hindi/Urdu?

For PG Sahib's benefit.

aar belaa paar belaa vich bele de gaaN
siNguuN phaR ke deo chaNjhuuRaa kardii e baaN baaN

I remember this from my childhood! I think I've got the words right. Well, what is the answer to this puzzle?
 
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  • panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    I swear I was going to ask the same question about "parla" today! I asked my father if there was a Hindi equivalent and he wasn't sure.

    I think the "aar-paar" bit is one of those examples of echo words, where one part is nonsensical when it's separated from its other half. So "aar" might have no meaning by itself, but "aar-paar" does. Kind of like "chaaii-waaii" (Punjabi: chaah-chuuh).
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    No, I don't believe "aar" is an echo word. Otherwise, why would we have "aar belaa paar belaa.." about which you did not comment.

    In Urdu, "parlaa" certainly exists. "vuh to parle darje kaa bad-ma'aash hai!"

    I would say, "chaa-shaa"!
     
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    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    PG SaHeb, I too feel that aar is not just an echo word. It does have a meaning on its own after all.

    "aar paar" normally means "across" when one is talking about one dimensional concept such as the width of a river or "through" when we have a three dimensional body in mind.

    In theory therefore, this side of a river is "aar" and the far side is "paar". However one often hears "is paar" and "us paar"! Why?

    Perhaps related or linked to paar is "pare" which in Punjabi is "paraaN". The opposite is "uraaN". Also there is the word "parlaa" for which in Punjabi there is a counterpart "urlaa".What are the equivalents for "uraaN" and "urlaa" in Hindi/Urdu?

    For PG Sahib's benefit.

    aar belaa paar belaa vich bele de gaaN
    siNguuN phaR ke deo chaNjhuuRaa kardii e baaN baaN

    I remember this from my childhood! I think I've got the words right. Well, what is the answer to this puzzle?
    I always felt that this use of is paar and us paar may somehow be due to a possible link between
    پار paar and پرے pare! Could it initially have been is pare and us pare anyway?

    If indeed our pare is related to our paar and the Punjabi paraaN is the equivalent of pare, then uraaN, the opposite of paraaN, would be the same as the opposite of paar, which is aar!


    The Hindi-Urdu equivalent of the Punjabi urlaa is parlaa, as you yourself say above, QP SaHeb!


    No, I don't believe "aar" is an echo word. Otherwise, why would we have "aar belaa paar belaa.." about which you did not comment.

    In Urdu, "parlaa" certainly exists. "vuh to parle darje kaa bad-ma'aash hai!"

    I would say, "chaa-shaa"!
    Yes, we do have
    پرلا parlaa. Here is Platts:

    H پرلا परला parlā [S. पर+ल], adj. (f. -ī), Of the other side or end; next in order; yonder:—parle-pār, adj. On the other side; far beyond; far away, far off, a long way off; through:—parle darje-kā = parle-sire-kā, adj. & adv. Great, thorough, extreme, excessive, of the first or highest degree;—in a complete degree, in the extreme, thoroughly, utterly, out and out.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    PG SaHeb, I too feel that aar is not just an echo word. It does have a meaning on its own after all.
    I always felt that this use of is paar and us paar may somehow be due to a possible link between پار paar and پرے pare! Could it initially have been is pare and us pare anyway?

    If indeed our pare is related to our paar and the Punjabi paraaN is the equivalent of pare, then uraaN, the opposite of paraaN, would be the same as the opposite of paar, which is aar!

    Urdu /Punjabi

    aar / aar (noun: The near side of something)

    paar / paar (noun: The far-side of something)

    ? /
    uraaN (adverb: close to)

    pare / paraaN (adverb: away from)

    ? /
    urlaa (adjective = "aar vaalaa")

    parlaa / parlaa (adjective= "paar vaalaa")

    is paar (This far side) and us paar (That far side) do seem rather illogical!

    Apparently vaar-paar is also used for aar-paar. (In Punjabi, I know we have 'raar" for "aar" as well).


    aar, uraaN and urlaa are proximates whereas paar, paraaN (pare) and parlaa are remote.
     
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    Machlii5

    Senior Member
    German
    Hi,
    I wonder if this has anything to do with Vile Parle in Mumbai. (cf. wikipedia: Vile Parle (Marathi: विलेपार्ले / विले पार्ले, Gujarati: વિલે પાર્લે Vilēpārlē), also known as "Parla", is a suburb of Mumbai. ... The name "Vile Parle" has been derived from the names of two hamlets 'Idla' and 'Padla'.) Or do Marathi / Gujarati have nothing in common with Hindi / Urdu / Punjabi?
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Further to my last, I have been able to find the "missing links".


    Urdu /Punjabi

    aar / aar (noun: The near side of something)

    paar / paar (noun: The far-side of something)

    vare* / uraaN (adverb: close to)


    pare / paraaN (adverb: away from)

    varlaa, urlaa** / urlaa (adjective = "aar vaalaa")


    parlaa / parlaa (adjective= "paar vaalaa")

    is paar (This far side) and us paar (That far side) do seem rather illogical!

    Apparently vaar-paar is also used for aar-paar. (In Punjabi, I know we have 'raar" for "aar" as well).


    aar, uraaN and urlaa are proximates whereas paar, paraaN (pare) and parlaa are remote.[/QUOTE]

    * Kitaabistaan's Twentieth Century Urdu/English Dictionary [Bashir Ahmed Qureshi]

    ** Platts
     
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    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Mushafi kaa ek shi3r

    aur sab tum se vare baiThe haiN
    ek ham haiN kih pare baiThe haiN

    aur saath hii Charx ChaniyoTii kaa

    vuh 3arz-i-vasl pih xaamosh ho ke baiTh ga'e
    nah aar ho ke chale vuh nah paar ho ke chale
     
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