Urdu-Hindi-Punjabi: kindle

Qureshpor

Senior Member
Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
Split form here.

Just remembered some beautiful lines from a beautiful movie ( Jagriti- Awakening) of my childhood days.

dekho kahii.n barbaad na hove ye bagiichaa
isko h'riday ( heart) ke khoon se baapu ( Mahatma Gandhi) ne hai sii.ncha
rekha hai ye chiraag shahido.n ne baal ( this is a Punjabi word meaning to light, lit) ke
is desh ko rakhanaa mere bachcho sambhaal ke
ham laye hain toofaan se kishtii nikaal ke......

From the word 'baal' another old song has come to my mind
battii baal ke banere utte rakhanii aan
galii bhul na jaye chann mera....:)

bakshink jii, you will be surprised to find out (as I was) that the "baalnaa" is a verb used in Urdu and Hindi, including its noun "baalan". (I am aware that in Punjabi there is a retroflex in both the noun and the verb).
 
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  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    bakshink jii, you will be surprised to find out (as I was) that the "baalnaa" is a verb used in Urdu and Hindi, including its noun "baalan". (I am aware that in Punjabi there is a retroflex in both the noun and the verb).
    You are right! But there is no retroflex for Urdu and Hindi, unless in some dialects. Also the retroflex is not always there in Punjabi. My preference goes to retroflex, anyway.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Though baalnaa exists in Hindi-Urdu lexicons its use is much less common than sulgaanaa. Well at least in our Urdu. Both mean to kindle / light a fire.

    Platts of course mentions both:

    H بالنا बालना bālnā [bāl = Prk. वाले(इ) or वाल(इ)=S. ज्वालय(ति), caus. of rt. ज्वल्], v.a. To kindle, to light (a fire, candle, &c.); to make a fire; to burn (=bārnā)

    سلگانا सुलगाना sulgānā, सिलगाना silgānā (caus. of sulagnā), v.t. To light, kindle, ignite, to cause to burn brightly; to inflame, incite, stir up, rouse.

    He mentions silgaanaa as well which we don’t use. We always say sulgaanaa = baalnaa.
     

    bakshink

    Senior Member
    punjabi
    (=bārnā)

    سلگانا सुलगाना sulgānā, सिलगाना silgānā (caus. of sulagnā), v.t. To light, kindle, ignite, to cause to burn brightly; to inflame, incite, stir up, rouse.
    sulaganaa is 'to smoulder' e.g. cigarette, chillum,dil (दिल), Beedii (बीड़ी), but 'ਦੀਵਾ ਬਾਲਣਾ', ਅਗ ਬਾਲਣਾ, ( diivaa baalanaa, ag baalanaa- to light a lamp, to start a fire) and ਬਾਲਨ ( Baalan- tinder).
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    sulaganaa is 'to smoulder' e.g. cigarette, chillum,dil (दिल), Beedii (बीड़ी), but 'ਦੀਵਾ ਬਾਲਣਾ', ਅਗ ਬਾਲਣਾ, ( diivaa baalanaa, ag baalanaa- to light a lamp, to start a fire) and ਬਾਲਨ ( Baalan- tinder).

    I must speak highly "retroflex" Punjabi (or "Tamil flavoured Punjabi"), because we say "baalaNR". Is it "baalan" in yours?
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    It just occurred to me that if we look at the intransitive verb "balanaa" (balaNRaa) and replace the "l" with an "r", we end up with something akin to "burn"! Interesting, don't you think?
     

    greatbear

    Banned
    India - Hindi & English
    It just occurred to me that if we look at the intransitive verb "balanaa" (balaNRaa) and replace the "l" with an "r", we end up with something akin to "burn"! Interesting, don't you think?

    There is certainly a theory that links "burn" and "brew" with Proto-Indo-European. See here.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    It just occurred to me that if we look at the intransitive verb "balanaa" (balaNRaa) and replace the "l" with an "r", we end up with something akin to "burn"! Interesting, don't you think?
    Actually the form with 'r' does exist in Urdu-Hindi as well; I've found it in my old dictionary, so the similiarity is striking. It would be another pair of Urdu-English words which deserves mentioning in the other thread:). greatbear has pointed out to etymology but in this case I'd tend to say that the resemblance has no historical backing. If the etymology of the English 'burn' is reliable, and it seems so, it means that 'burn' does not appear to share the same PIE source as 'barnaa'/balnaa' has. The word can be traced down to the Sanskrit द्वल्, and it seems the same can be said about 'jalnaa'.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Qureshpor SaaHib, I have noticed recently somebody say lekiNR.

    Even we draw the line somewhere, marrish SaaHib!:) What I had in mind was words which are "Indic Punjabi" and not Perso-Arabic. Having said this, I believe I too have heard "lekiNR"! Or was it "lekaNR"?
     
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