Urdu-Hindi-Punjabi: Some family relations

Qureshpor

Senior Member
Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
I am curious to find out why there is a slight deviation in the way a few relationships differ in Urdu from Punjabi and Hindi.

Punjabi/Hindi: maamaa, chaachaa

Urdu: maamuuN, chachaa

Punjabi: maasii, Hindi: mausii

Urdu: xaalah (Do Urdu speakers ever use mausii?)

There are more examples but I shall leave it to others to bring them up in future posts.
 
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  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Thank you, Qureshpor SaaHib, for bringing this issue unto attention of this forum. I hope we can have a conglomerated thread on all family relations, including those where there are more than one wives and their children.

    You are asking why there is a deviation. I don't know, it is most probably the tradition of usage.

    I have never heard mausii from an Urdu-go. It's always xaalah for us. I am not saying that some Urdu speakers can use it, but in my extended family it is never used. On the other hand, chaachaa is used for people of age but not family relations.
     

    UrduMedium

    Senior Member
    Urdu (Karachi)
    ^ I agree with marrish saahab's observations above.

    Another source of confusion for me growing up was between mumaanii and maamii. I grew up saying mumaani in Karachi, but often heard maamii from my cousins from the northern half of the country.
     

    greatbear

    Banned
    India - Hindi & English
    And is "buaa" always "buaa" (father's sister), or can she also be "fuufii" ("fuufaa" being father's sister's husband)? Meanwhile, in Gujarati, yet again "maasii".
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Never buaa for me. Always, phuphii (not fuufii)

    Punjabi: p_huuaa

    Hindi: bu'aa

    Urdu: phuuphii (and phuppii) (cf. phuuphaa/phuupaa and phuppaa)

    Punjabi & Hindi: maamaa/maamii, chaachaa/chaachii
    Urdu: maamuuN/mumaanii, chachaa/chachii
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    ^ I agree with marrish saahab's observations above.

    Another source of confusion for me growing up was between mumaanii and maamii. I grew up saying mumaani in Karachi, but often heard maamii from my cousins from the northern half of the country.
    I've heard maamii while in Karachi too, when addressing the person in question directly.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    ^ Thanks for bringing the older threads to attention, through it my wish to have a bigger thread for different relatives in Urdu-Hindi-Punjabi has been granted :).
     
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    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Urdu: biivii
    Hindi: patnii
    Punjabi: janaanii* (tiimii in Eastern Punjab)

    * I don't know if this has anything to do with "zanaanii" (Persian: zan = woman)

    Urdu: susraal
    Hindi: sasuraal
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Urdu: biivii
    Hindi: patnii
    Punjabi: janaanii* (tiimii in Eastern Punjab)

    * I don't know if this has anything to do with "zanaanii" (Persian: zan = woman)

    Urdu: susraal
    Hindi: sasuraal
    For Punjabi, I have not heard tiimii. vó_hTii very much. PG SaaHib can tell us more on this point, I hope.

    * The connection zan-janaanii seems convincing to me, janaanii being used for a woman in general as well.

    biivii is probably also used in Hindi as well as Urdu, but it would be better someone confirms it.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    For Punjabi, I have not heard tiimii. vó_hTii very much. PG SaaHib can tell us more on this point, I hope.

    Yes, vohtii would also be used but its primary meaning is "bride". My Sikh friends use "tiimii" all the time. I had never heard of this word in Western Punjab.
     

    greatbear

    Banned
    India - Hindi & English
    Yes, "biivii" is of course used in Hindi as well. Also, "susraal" is the much, much more commonly used (spoken) word than "sasuraal" in Hindi (though in writing one may write the latter).
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    It seems this has become the main thread for dealing with various family relations so I thought I'd kill two birds with one stone since also questions regarding the proper Urdu pronunciation are being raised nowadays. In this short humorous piece you'll find both *many* family relations and a very good Urdu diction!

    Just look on YT for [Paglon ka Doctor Voice by: Zia Mohiuddin]. I guess you are going to love it!
     
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