Urdu, Hindi, Punjabi: windy

  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Urdu:

    "Windy" in a sentence such as "Tomorrow the weather is likely to be windy" would more often than not be expressed something like:

    kal tez havaa chalne kaa imkaan hai.

    "aandhii aanaa/chalnaa" could be used but "aandhii" seems too strong and is more a storm than merely windy weather. But, if one had to translate "windy weather"..

    tez havaa vaalaa mausam......sounds fine to me. One could substitute "tez" with "tund".

    tund havaa kaa mausam

    baad-i-tund vaalaa mausam

    "havaa" on its own of course can mean "wind"

    ek havaa kaa jhauNkaa* aayaa ghar ke diip bujhaane
    kah nah sakuuN maiN chup jo rahuuN to pyaar miraa nah maane

    (* a gust of wind)

    If you wanted to say, "it's windy", then we could say.."havaa bahut tez hai".

    How about a one word equivalent for "windy" (jhakkaR)?

    marrish SaaHib, "tund-baad" meN "Sindbad" kaa jahaaz hichkole khaane lagaa.

    Punjabi: hanerii te ch_hakkhaR

    The problem is "mausam" is not only weather but also a season.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    marrish said:
    How would you say "windy weather" in Urdu, Hindi and Punjabi?
    Some more suggestions. Do any of the following seem appropriate?

    پر (باد/ہوا/ریح) موسم - pur (baad/hawaa/reeH) mausam
    (باد/ہوا/ریح) آلود موسم - (baad/hawaa/reeH) aaluud mausam (Based on: ابر آلود - cloudy; دھند/کہر آلود - foggy; گرد آلود - dusty; etc.)
    (باد/ہوا/ریح) دار موسم - (baad/hawaa/reeH) daar mausam

    Question: Could ہوائی be used in this case?
    Qureshpor said:
    ek havaa kaa jhauNkaa* aayaa ghar ke diip bujhaane
    kah nah sakuuN maiN chup jo rahuuN to pyaar miraa nah maane
    Credits: Lyricist(s): Faiyyaz Hashmi and/or Masroor Anwar; Film: Banjaran (1962)
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    In Hindi, we use mostly "havadaar mausam". With more of a long wind, we can say "pavan ke tez jhonkoN vaalaa samay/mausam/din/kaal".
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    I'm not sure what the proper word was for this, but I've been using baadii myself, with popular acceptance.

    The suggestions above are all pretty good. In fact, legend has it that Hawai got its name when Arabic-speaking Africans described to the locals that their land was remarkably windy.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Many thanks for so many suggestions. If and when I get the chance of listening to Urdu weather forecasts and come across something I will inform you.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    The only problem I have with baadii is that it is mostly understood as 'flatuent'. I have not had a chance to see what Urdu forecasts use but I've got a very simple idea: hawaa waalaa mausam! I would not use riiH because I don't know it, then havaa-daar can be confused with Hawaaldaar :D. -aaluud is not something that can be used for wind or air, take it for granted.

    EDIT: Oh sorry, now I can see I didn't see QP, mundiya and Cilquiestsuens SaaHib's tez havaa vaalaa mausam. Indisputable. If we only take tez away.
     
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    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Examples of hawaa-daar from poetry:

    mausam hai raNgeelaa, geelaa aur hawaa-daar
    gulshan hai bhaRkeelaa, neelaa aur xushbuu-daar

    Muneer Niazi


    موسم ہے رنگیلا، گیلا اور ہوا دار
    گلشن ہے بھڑکیلا، نیلا اور خشبودار

    منیر نیازی
    woh aik abr-e-giraaN-baar tha magar us/is din
    zaraa fazaa ko hawaa-daar karne aayaa thaa

    Zafar Iqbal


    وہ ایک ابرِ گراں بار تھا مگر اس دن
    ذرا فضا کو ہوادار کرنے آیا تھا

    ظفر اقبال
     
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    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Thank you very much Alfaaz SaaHib. I was only joking when I said that hawaa-daar was not OK. These examples are very good indeed. Perfect.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Like in the second example from Zafar Iqbal - I feel the cloud came to make the atmosphere more airy (to reduce heat and make breathing more pleasant).
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    BP.7859 said:
    rThe suggestions aboveare all pretty good. In fact, legend has it that Hawai got its name when Arabic-speaking Africans described to the locals that their land was remarktempestuousdy.

    If you mean Hawaii above than surely that legend is not correct. I would assume the Polynesians would be responsible for their homeland's term.
    Nevertheless how about Hawa'ii as in Hawa'ii kaa sama' for windy if hawaa dar is to be treated as airy. Yes hawa'ii most commonly means to do with the air i.e. hawa'ii jahaaz but inferences can be made with ease. May remind some people here of the semi-nonesensical musical number Hawaa Hawaii ;) of yesteryear. Secondly, both rihii and baadii can mean flatulence, therefore either both are correct or neither are. That could be deciphered by whether they are used in their derived languages that way. Nevertheless, pur hawaa, baad (used so I believe in Persian) and riih too should do.

    Jhaunkaa? Doesn't that mean a breeze being the indic equivalent of a breeze I.e. Nasiim? Breezy and windy differ breeze is pleasant windy can mean vigorous and bothersome. Winds can be tempestous, a breeze is not. With regards to Punjabi I shall ask my dad at a more suitable time ;) not this ungodly hour.
     
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