Urdu-Hindi: singhaar vs singaar

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Qureshpor

Senior Member
Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
In another forum a discussion took place on the subject of whether the word is "singhaar" (سنگھار सिंघार) or singaar (سنگار सिंगार) for make up. Urdu speakers leant towards the former and the Hindi ones to the latter. What views do members of this group have on this topic? If we do have two similar but seperate words in the two languages, what is the reason for this difference?
 
  • nineth

    Senior Member
    Hindi, Telugu
    Evolution? Singaar is easier to pronounce/use (simplicity and speed) - only a linguist may know what causes such changes, and say, why other similar sounding words didn't change or have changed. It would help if one lists other loan-words that have undergone changes.
     
    Last edited:

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Yes, in Urdu it is sing-haar سنگھار सिंघार while in Hindi, singaar سنگار सिंगार. I have no diificulty in pronouncing either! Not sure when / why this shift took place.
     

    nineth

    Senior Member
    Hindi, Telugu
    Yes, in Urdu it is sing-haar سنگھار सिंघार while in Hindi, singaar سنگار सिंगार. I have no diificulty in pronouncing either! Not sure when / why this shift took place.
    Yes, none may be difficult to pronounce, but relatively speaking, which one do you find easier to use? I assume singaar due to the absence of aspiration. This doesn't mean aspiration was dropped in many or most cases; again, we can analyze better if we have other examples. Say, a theory could be: "in all cases where there was a gh following a n/N/m, gh became g or bh -> b" or something more specific - as an example.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Yes, none may be difficult to pronounce, but relatively speaking, which one do you find easier to use? I assume singaar due to the absence of aspiration. This doesn't mean aspiration was dropped in many or most cases; again, we can analyze better if we have other examples. Say, a theory could be: "in all cases where there was a gh following a n/N/m, gh became g or bh -> b" or something more specific - as an example.
    Due to habit, it happens to be sing-haar سنگھار सिंघार ! Agree that it'll be good to look at other examples where we see this shift.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    According to Urdu LuGhat, the word "siNghaar" is attested in "Sab-ras" written in 1635 while "singaar" is found in a work by Quli Qutb Shah dating back to 1611. So, it seems that both these words are of pretty old vintage.

    I was looking at a book called "Ruup" by the renowned Urdu poet Firaq Gorakhpuri ( Raghupati Sahay "Firaq" Gorakhpuri 1896-1982), published in 1945. On the inside of the cover of the book, there is the following ...

    ...... jis tarH Firaq Gorakhpuri kii singaar-ras kii rubaa3iyoN kaa yih majmuu3ah.....

    But on the next page one has "Ruup [singhaar-ras kii rubaa3iyaaN]".

    Any further comments on these two words will be welcome.
     

    Ali Smith

    Senior Member
    Urdu - Pakistan
    I think there's a similar phenomenon with पौधा and पौदा (plant).
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I think there's a similar phenomenon with पौधा and पौदा (plant).
    لیکن اردو والوں نے پودھے کو ترک کر کے پودے کو اختیار کیا ہے جب کہ سنگھار کی صورتِ حال اِس نظریے کے بر عکس ہے۔
     

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    For those interested in the etymology, the etymon is śŕ̊ṅgāra and details are below.

    śŕ̊ṅgāra n. ʻ sexual desire ʼ lex., ʻ amorous pursuits, finery ʼ MBh. [Cf. śŕ̊ṅga -- n. ʻ arrogance ʼ MBh. <-> śŕ̊ṅga -- ?]
    Pa. siṅgāra -- m. ʻ erotic sentiment ʼ; Pk. siṁgāra -- m. ʻ adornment, sexual passion ʼ; Kt. ṣiṅgerå ʻ beautiful ʼ; S. sī˜gāro m. ʻ decoration ʼ, P. siṅgār, saṅ˚ m., N. siṅār; Or. siṅgāra ʻ toilette, beauty due to toilette ʼ; Mth. sĩgār ʻ adornment ʼ, OAw. siṁgāra m., H. sĩgār, ˚rā m.
    *śr̥ṅgārayati, śr̥ṅgārita -- . Addenda: śŕ̊ṅgāra -- : Garh. sĩgār ʻdecorationʼ.

    singhaar (more so in Urdu) in place of singaar probably arose due to “contamination” with words of similar structure such as singh and singhaasan. A good parallel to this is saugandh (more so in Hindi) in place of saugand from “contamination” with words such as sugandh and sugandhit.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    For those interested in the etymology, the etymon is śŕ̊ṅgāra and details are below.

    śŕ̊ṅgāra n. ʻ sexual desire ʼ lex., ʻ amorous pursuits, finery ʼ MBh. [Cf. śŕ̊ṅga -- n. ʻ arrogance ʼ MBh. <-> śŕ̊ṅga -- ?]
    Pa. siṅgāra -- m. ʻ erotic sentiment ʼ; Pk. siṁgāra -- m. ʻ adornment, sexual passion ʼ; Kt. ṣiṅgerå ʻ beautiful ʼ; S. sī˜gāro m. ʻ decoration ʼ, P. siṅgār, saṅ˚ m., N. siṅār; Or. siṅgāra ʻ toilette, beauty due to toilette ʼ; Mth. sĩgār ʻ adornment ʼ, OAw. siṁgāra m., H. sĩgār, ˚rā m.
    *śr̥ṅgārayati, śr̥ṅgārita -- . Addenda: śŕ̊ṅgāra -- : Garh. sĩgār ʻdecorationʼ.

    singhaar (more so in Urdu) in place of singaar probably arose due to “contamination” with words of similar structure such as singh and singhaasan. A good parallel to this is saugandh (more so in Hindi) in place of saugand from “contamination” with words such as sugandh and sugandhit.
    Thank you @desi4life. Your response is much appreciated. I suspect your reasoning is most likely to be correct. I have tried to get some information on the usage of these two words from Urdu sources but hitherto without success. Both siNgaar and siNghaar are found in Urdu writings. Also one finds siNghaasan in Urdu.
     
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