Urdu, Hindi: to have a propensity to do something

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

The way to express the ide of "having a propensity/proclivity to do something, tend todo something" is:

[subject in oblique] + ko + [oblique infinitive] + kaa chaskaa lagnaa ?

I found this construction in the verse from Gulzar's song "nainaa Thag leNge":

bhalaa maNdaa dekhe na(h) paraayaa na(h) sagaa re
nainoN ko to Dasne kaa chaskaa lagaa re


For example, if I wanted to say: "Kids have a propensity to lie", it would be:

bachchoN ko jhuuTh bolne kaa chaskaa lagaa?

Thanks in advance for any help.
 
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  • aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    chaskaa is maybe a little more than just a propensity to do something. It's used when one starts doing something repeatedly because it gives one pleasure.

    Platts
    H چسکا चसका ćaskā [prob. fr. S. चष्], s.m. Taste (for), relish; longing, ardent desire; prurience, itching; habit, custom: — ćaskā paṛnā, ćaskā lagnā, ćaskā ho-jānā (-), To acquire or have a taste (for), &c.

    Shabdsagar
    चसका संज्ञा पुं० [सं० चषण] १. किसी वस्तु (विशेषत:खाने पीने की वस्तु) या किसी काम में एक या अनेक बार मिला हुआ आनंद, जो प्राय: उस चीज के पुन: पाने या उस काम के पुन: करने की इच्छा उत्पन्न करता है । शौक । चाट ।२. इस प्रकार की पड़ी हुई आदत । लत । जैसे,—उसे शराब पीने का चसका लग गया है । क्रि० प्र०—डालना ।—पड़ना । लगना ।

    Rough translation: (1) The pleasure found in a thing or act, which often results in the desire to acquire that thing again or do that act again; shauk; chaaT. (2) A habit acquired in such a way; lat; eg, use sharaab piine kaa chaskaa lag gayaa hai.

    Also note the appearance of similar pleasure-related words (mazah, shauq, ...) in the Urdu Lughat entry.
    چَسْکا
    ۱. مزہ، چاٹ.
    ۲. لت ، عادت.
    ۳. ذوق ، شوق ؛ لطف.

    So bachchoN ko jhuuTh bolne kaa chaskaa lagaa would be closer to "the children acquired a taste for lying" than "children have a propensity to lie."
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    Hmmm "penchant" is in the ballpark too. I'm not opposed to it, but some of Platts's proposed translations (esp. "taste" and "habit") feel a bit closer to me. The second line of the lyrics is something like, "The eyes have developed a taste for biting," but "biting" is being used here metaphorically to mean something along the lines of "deceiving" or "betraying" (Dasnaa is what a snake does!).
     

    Illuminatus

    Senior Member
    USA
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    चस्का लगना has a sense of addiction to it, which words like penchant or propensity lack. In particular, proclivity / propensity convey a sense of a natural inclination towards an action, where as चस्का implies something quite the opposite. It has the sense of someone trying out something and getting allured / addicted to the pleasure of the act.

    For eg. if you want to say "Kids have a propensity to lie", a more natural translation would be "बच्चों की झूठ बोलने की आदत होती है" (Kids are habituated to lying / kids have a habit of lying).

    बच्चों को झूठ बोलने का चस्का लग गया है would only make sense if there is additional context where the kid lied, benefited from it, and got 'addicted' to it.

    For eg. maybe they didn't do their homework, lied to the teacher to escape punishment, and have now gotten addicted to lying (after having witnessed its benefits).

    A common idiomatic use of this word is: शेर को इंसान के खून का चस्का लगना (the lion getting addicted / used to the taste of human blood [upon which they will try to hunt more humans])
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    For eg. if you want to say "Kids have a propensity to lie", a more natural translation would be "बच्चों की झूठ बोलने की आदत होती है" (Kids are habituated to lying / kids have a habit of lying).

    While I agree that "chaskaa lagnaa" has nothing do with propensity, I do not agree with this translation, as propensity does not mean habit (of course, propensity can lead to habit): it is not necessary that a propensity in a person will get realised. Propensity is simply a latent desire (a latent direction of growth, so to speak), and it may never come to fruition if the right (or wrong) circumstances do not conspire together.

    A translation (in Hindi), in my opinion, for "Kids have a propensity to lie," could be "bacchoN meN jhooT(h) bolne kii pravritti hotii hai/paayii jaatii hai." In some contexts, it could also be translated as "jhukaao" (leaning): just like in English, one could sometimes say someone leans towards doing something.

    Even if one were to speak of a habitual thing in a class of population, I would rather put it as "aadii honaa" (e.g., "bachcheN jhooT(h) bolne ke aadii hote haiN" - but this would mean being habituated, not propensity) rather than "aadat honaa" - the second is a much more direct, aggressive way, and a statement like there's some prevalence of a habit in some class usually doesn't justify such aggressiveness.

    My post is from (my) Hindi's point of view, of course.
     
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    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    In Urdu, I would go for something like...

    bachchoN kaa jhuuT bolne kii taraf jhukaa'o hotaa hai.

    bachche jhuuT bolne kii taraf maa'il hote haiN.

    A مائل māʼil, corr. māyal (act, part. of ميل 'to incline,' &c.), adj. Inclining (to or towards, -kī t̤araf, or -par), leaning; inclined; propense, having a propensity, or inclination, or partiality (for); biassed; fond (of), taking delight (in), addicted (to); apt: — māʼil karnā, v.t. To make (one) inclined (to, -kī t̤araf), to incline, bend, bias, &c.: — māʼil honā (-kī t̤araf, or -par), To be inclined (to, or towards), to incline, lean; to be addicted (to), &c.
     

    Illuminatus

    Senior Member
    USA
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    @littlepond is right that propensity / inclination don't have the same sense as aadat, and I am familiar with words like pravritti etc., but I used aadat in my example because that's what I imagine everyday speakers to actually say for expressing a similar sentiment in everyday context. I visualized this conversation between say two mothers chit-chatting about how their kids lie all the time and my example with aadat is what sounded most likely / natural to me.

    If OP has a more specific context or use-case or literally wants to know a dictionary translation, I definitely agree pravritti would work better. If I were translating a casual conversation though, I'd probably still use aadat.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    @littlepond is right that propensity / inclination don't have the same sense as aadat, and I am familiar with words like pravritti etc., but I used aadat in my example because that's what I imagine everyday speakers to actually say for expressing a similar sentiment in everyday context. I visualized this conversation between say two mothers chit-chatting about how their kids lie all the time and my example with aadat is what sounded most likely / natural to me.

    If the two mothers in question are discussing children and their propensity of lying, they would not be using "aadat," for that would not mean what they are discussing; "pravritti" and "jhukaao" are also everyday words, used in "natural" conversations and chit-chats. For example, one mother complaining "mera laRkaa aaj-kal baRaa jhooTh boltaa hai, lagtaa hai aadat hii paR gayii hai!" To which, the other mother replies, "are, itnaa bhii ise dil pe nahiiN lo, bachchoN meN to jhooTh bolne kii pravritti hotii hii hai."
    Of course, the other mother may have said "bachchoN meN to jhooTh bolne kii aadat hotii hii hai," but then that mother is saying "children (in general) have the habit of lying" (a much more aggressive, even criminalising statement) and not "children have a propensity of lying."

    If the two mothers are question are discussing some kind of addiction or habit of lying that their children have got, then, of course, they would use "aadat" (or "chaskaa," if context warrants it, as explained well in Post 5): like in the previous example, when the first mother said "aaj-kal mere laRke ko jhooT(h) bolne kii aadat lag/paR gayii hai." This "aadat" means habit and has nothing to do with propensity.
     
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