Urdu, Hindi: yadii - yadi

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

I learnt this new conjunction, from a medical bill I received yesterday (in Hindi):

क्या आप इस दस्तावेज़ को पढ़ सकते हैं? यदि नहीं, तो हम इसे पढ़ने में आपकी सहायता करने हेतु किसी की व्यवस्था कर सकते हैं|
kyaa aap is dastavez ko paRh sakte haiN? yadi nahiiN to ham ise paRhne meN aapkii sahaayata karne hetu kisii kii vyavastha kar sakte haiN.

My question is, does yadi (= "if, in case of") have an Urdu equivalent? Platts lists يد but the Urdu Lughat has یَدی instead. Are those the same word?

Also, is it of common use in Urdu?

I am asking because the examples given by the Urdu Lughat seem a little contrived. I understand the plain sentence in Hindi above (they want their money, and need to be clear, afer all 😊) but with the Lughat sentences, being of the sententious/poetic kind, I am having a lot more difficulty.
Urdu Lughat
Could you help me understand what they say?

یدی گرم کرتی ہوں ٹک صبر دیو
نہیں یاں تے تمنا لجاتا ہے دیو

(Something about "warming", "a god" and "being patient", but that "یاں تے" baffles me ...)


یدی آئی فوج عادل سوائی
ہوی سارے لشکر میں چوندہرا وائی

(Something about "an army", "and encampment" and "someone being just", but I am not even sure if the words are separated correctly ...)​


Thanks in advance for any help
 
  • The usual equivalent word for “yadi” in Urdu and spoken Hindi (and sometimes written Hindi) is “agar”, which is of Persian origin. “yadi” is common in literary Hindi. It may be used to some extent in Urdu as well but it is rare (spelled یدی “yadii”; يد is “yad” and thus an inaccurate spelling). A form used regionally in Hindi and perhaps Urdu too is “jadi” with the Sanskrit “y” Prakritized to “j”.
     
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    Whatever the spelling might be, it's not used in Urdu. The Urdu Lughat provides a description which doesn't match the Hindi meaning of the Hindi word, referring, amongst other, to magar, not agar.
     
    Whatever the spelling might be, it's not used in Urdu. The Urdu Lughat provides a description which doesn't match the Hindi meaning of the Hindi word, referring, amongst other, to magar, not agar.
    “yadii” is found in the Rekhta Urdu dictionary, which to me suggests that it could be used to some extent in Urdu. 🤔 I interpreted the Urdu lughat description to be a mistake because it’s not defined as “magar” in Platts or any other dictionary.
     
    As far as I've noticed "Rekhta Urdu dictionary" consists mainly of Urdu LuGhat, taariixii usuul par, plus some amount of some other pirated contents from around the net, so the mere presence of a word in that database can't guarantee anything particular, let alone hint at the actual usage. Nevertheless, in case the entry turns out alright, rextah is an old and extinct form of the language.

    The entry in Urdu Lughat from the given link says it is archaic and regional (Deccan) anyway, so I can't grasp what's the fuss about it. It is not a contemporary Urdu word.

    یَدی (فت ی) قدیمم ف
    yadii (fat. ye) qadiimm f.

    (دکن) مگر، ابھی، اس وقت.
    magar, abhii, is waqt (dakan)

    I agree magar could be a typo — the online version of Urdu Lughat urgently needs some thorough proof-reading, see قدیمم for قدیم while the other online dictionary only multiplicates the errors — but still H. यदि does not mean ابھی، اس وقت, does it?
     
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