Urdu: I remained silent

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  • panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Exactly. /chup/ and /khamosh/ are synonyms here. I arbitrarily defined /chup/ as quiet and /khamosh/ as silent.

    Platts defines /chup/ the following way:
    16. चुप ćup : (page 421)
    left;--carelessness; unsteadiness, want of principle. चुप ćupH चुप ćup [cf. S. चुप् 'to move quietly or stealthily'], s.f. Silence, quiet, stillness;--adj. & adv. Quiet, silent; secret, stealthy;--quietly, silently, &c.;--intj. Silence! be quiet! (=ćup rah):--ćup-ā-ćup, ćup-ćup, ćup-ćāp, adj. & adv. Quite silent, perfectly quiet or still: silently, softly, quietly, secretly, furtively, stealthily:--ćup rahnā, ćup
    17. चुप ćup : (page 421)
    ćup [cf. S. चुप् 'to move quietly or stealthily'], s.f. Silence, quiet, stillness;--adj. & adv. Quiet, silent; secret, stealthy;--quietly, silently, &c.;--intj. Silence! be quiet! (=ćup rah):--ćup-ā-ćup, ćup-ćup, ćup-ćāp, adj. & adv. Quite silent, perfectly quiet or still: silently, softly, quietly, secretly, furtively, stealthily:--ćup rahnā, ćup sādhnā, ćup lagānā, v.n. To remain silent, to practice silence, to be dumb:--ćup lagnā (-ko), To be struck cumb:--ćup nāṅdhnā,​
    18. चुप ćup : (page 421)
    Silence! be quiet! (=ćup rah):--ćup-ā-ćup, ćup-ćup, ćup-ćāp, adj. & adv. Quite silent, perfectly quiet or still: silently, softly, quietly, secretly, furtively, stealthily:--ćup rahnā, ćup sādhnā, ćup lagānā, v.n. To remain silent, to practice silence, to be dumb:--ćup lagnā (-ko), To be struck cumb:--ćup nāṅdhnā, v.n.=ćup rahnā, q.v.:--ćup hoke, adv. Silently, quietly, in silence:--cup honā or ho-jānā, v.n. To be or become silent, be speechless; to​
    19. चुप ćup : (page 421)
    v.n. To remain silent, to practice silence, to be dumb:--ćup lagnā (-ko), To be struck cumb:--ćup nāṅdhnā, v.n.=ćup rahnā, q.v.:--ćup hoke, adv. Silently, quietly, in silence:--cup honā or ho-jānā, v.n. To be or become silent, be speechless; to be silenced. चप्पा ćappāH चप्पा ćappā [S. चप+कः;--cf. ćauwā], s.m. A hand-breadth, a measure of four fingers, a span
    /khamosh/ is define this way.
    24. ḵẖamosh : (page 494)
    rt. 'to take the fifth,' &c.), adj. Five;--s.m. An aggregate of five poetical pieces; a stanza of five lines. ḵẖamoshP ḵẖamosh (contrac. of ḵẖāmosh), adj. Silent; dumb;--intj. Be silent! silence!
    ḵẖamoshānP ḵẖamoshān, s.m. pl. (of ḵẖamosh), The silent ones, the dead.
    25. ḵẖamosh : (page 494)
    'to take the fifth,' &c.), adj. Five;--s.m. An aggregate of five poetical pieces; a stanza of five lines. ḵẖamoshP ḵẖamosh (contrac. of ḵẖāmosh), adj. Silent; dumb;--intj. Be silent! silence!
    ḵẖamoshānP ḵẖamoshān, s.m. pl. (of ḵẖamosh), The silent ones, the dead.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Another way to say this is: ميں نے سكوت فرمايا (maine sukuut farmaayaa) but I think the register of that is slightly higher.

    سكوت = from Arabic "سـ - كـ - ت" (sa-ka-ta = to be silent)
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    I am not familiar with the word sâket but I can at least say that ârâm would not work in this case. /aaraam/ in Urdu means rest.
    in literary Persian it sometimes mean "tranquility, rest" but we have ârâmesh for this sense. ârâm means quiet and I thought it might also have the same sense in Urdu. So, I was wrong. Thanks.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    in literary Persian it sometimes mean "tranquility, rest" but we have ârâmesh for this sense. ârâm means quiet and I thought it might also have the same sense in Urdu. So, I was wrong. Thanks.
    Literary Urdu draws heavily from Persian. Though I've never seen the word, it hardly means that it doesn't exist...I almost expect to encounter it next week in my Ghazal class!!!
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Now I get it. So sokut means silent in Urdu. In Persian sokut means silence whereas sâket means silent, quiet.
    No!! sukuut means silence! (in Urdu too I mean). It's the same in Persian as it is in Urdu :) But note in Urdu the words are pronounced "sukuut" and "saakit" respectively.

    "maine sukuut farmaayaa" literally means something like "I observed silence". It's the noun silence being used here, not the adjective silent.

    saakit is used in Urdu too, but the average Urdu-speaker might not know its meaning. Lets take an example sentence:

    يہ كتاب صرف عورتوں كے بارے ميں تذكره كرتى ہے، ليكن مردوں كے بارے ميں ساكت ہے
    [yeh kitaab sirf aurtoN ke baare mai tazkiraa karti hai, lekin mardoN ke baare mai saakit hai]
    The book only mentions women, but it mentions nothing about men (lit. "it is silent about men").

    As I said before, it comes from Arabic "sa-ka-ta".
     
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