Urdu: khule aam

MonsieurGonzalito

Senior Member
Castellano de Argentina
Friends,

Does khule aam (کھلے آم) exist in Urdu (in the sense of "openly", "freely")?

I found a couple of appearances on the Internet, but I don't know if they are mere Hindi transliterations of "खुलेआम" , for example:

zyaadaatar doSHii bach nikalte haiN aur khule aam ghuumte rahte haiN

Thanks in advance.
 
  • littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Friends,

    Does khule aam (کھلے آم) exist in Urdu (in the sense of "openly", "freely")?

    Is there any other sense of "khule aam" in either of Hindi or Urdu? There is only one sense: of course, it may be translated differently in a target language in different situations.

    And it would be very strange if it were not to exist in Urdu, given that each of "khulaa" and "aam" exist in both Urdu and Hindi registers.
     

    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    ^ I think the issue for @MonsieurGonzalito jii is that the Hindi spelling and the Urdu spelling are different. In Hindi it’s “khule aam”, but in Urdu it’s “khule 3aamm”. So if searching the wrong spelling, few results will appear on the internet.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    littlepond said:
    Is there any other sense of "khule aam" in either of Hindi or Urdu?
    Urdu script/spelling differentiates between کھلے آم - khule aam - open mangos and کھلے عامّ - khule 3aamm - openly, freely; without restraint; etc.
     
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    Happu

    Senior Member
    German
    Urdu script/spelling differentiates between کھلے آم - khule aam - open mangos and کھلے عامّ - khule 3aamm - openly, freely; without restraint; etc.
    In Hindi / Devanagari, the aam for 1) 'mango' and 2) 'common / public' may appear to be the same word, but of course it's not really - the first is from Sanskrit (aamraa), the latter from Arabic (aamm). Thus, by differentiating the respective spellings, Urdu is more precise.

    An Indian once tried to explain to me that the mango is called aam, because it's a very common fruit in India. Well, well, well ...
     
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    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    ^ Homonyms can certainly lead to folk etymologies like this, but it would be readily apparent from the context of a sentence whether the intended meaning of “aam” is mango or common/public.
     
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    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I would just like to say that کھُلے عام appears to be a relatively new construction. I say this because Urdu LuGhat which is the most comprehensive Urdu dictionary in existence, cites historical usage of words and this seems to go back only as far as the 1960s. It's not found in Platts or Asifiyyah.
     
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    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    An Indian once tried to explain to me that the mango is called aam, because it's a very common fruit in India. Well, well, well ...

    ^ Homonyms can certainly lead to folk etymologies like this, but it would be readily apparent from the context of a sentence whether the intended meaning of “aam” is mango or common/public.

    And it could also have been a reference from that Indian to the "mango man" ... we Hindiphones love playing with words.
     
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    Happu

    Senior Member
    German
    "And it could also have been a reference from that Indian to the "mango man" ... we Hindiphones love playing with words."

    Any party promoting mangoes or mango men (vendors) is all right with me. Call me the Alphonso or Hapuus man.

    :)
     
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