Urdu: mostly

panjabigator

Senior Member
Am. English
Is the word <peshtar> synonymous with <zyaadatar>, or is there some nuance here I am missing. Hindi interestingly has a seemingly identical suffix here for the same word: <adhiktar>. Any speculation as to where this suffix comes from?
 
  • panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Yikes! Urdu dyslexia, I suppose! I switched the <be> for a <pe> here, but regardless, my question was solved. Thank you both of you.

    Any ideas about the suffix <tar> here? Hindi and Urdu both have it: <adhiktar> and <beshtar>.
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    My Hindi is not up to it to say anything about <adhiktar> but if I hazard a guess then it might be the same as we use -tar in Farsi and Urdu, i.e. for a compariso. We have had a discussion about comparatives I recall.

    So, beh = good (hardly used in Urdu anymore), behtar = better and behtareen = best.
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    PG, Illumin too once noticed that Hindi and Urdu both have a second-degree comparative suffix -tar. The other two are different.

    Your bringing up paishtar (Fr: préalablement; Eng: beforehand) reminds me of an expression fauran say paishtar (future: even before right now).
     

    lafz_puchnevala

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    So, can I then say that 'peshtar' is interchangeable with 'pehle'? Eg. Iske pehle/peshtar, main khana khaa rahaa thaa. Does this sound right?

    Also, I have heard from other posts that although 'beshtar' and 'zyaadatar' are the same in meaning, its usage is different? How so? Eg. zyaadatar, main bazriyaa bus school jataa hun.' How to change this using 'beshtar'?

    Thanks!
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    I've never heard "iske ke peshtar" but I have heard "is ke qabl" before.
    You've got one kee too many. However, I'd rather put (in our variety of the language) a see in its place i.e. is see peeshtar.

    We could also turn it head to tail and say peeshtar az iin (or peesh az iin), just as we often say qabl az iin.
     
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    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    You've got one kee too many. However, I'd rather put (in our variety of the language) a see in its place i.e. is see peeshtar.

    We could also turn it head to tail and say peeshtar az iin (or peesh az iin), just as we often say qabl az iin.
    Yes, preferably we use se here. We also say peshtar az iiN (we don't pronounce it as a full noon).
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Also, I have heard from other posts that although 'beshtar' and 'zyaadatar' are the same in meaning, its usage is different? How so? Eg. zyaadatar, main bazriyaa bus school jataa hun.' How to change this using 'beshtar'?
    Thanks!

    Normally we say in Urdu ziyaadah-tar in such a context but if you wish to go for beshtar, it wouldn't be strictly wrong. However one would wish to expand the phrase by adding beshtar auqaat.

    Please note that bazriyaa has been already discussed in one of your threads. If you haven't noticed it let me ask you to put your attention to the fact that it means a market place! Only bazari3ah can be used in your example if you will make some sense. Furthermore, note that English bus is spelt as bas in Urdu, and school as skuul or iskuul.
     

    souminwé

    Senior Member
    North American English, Hindi
    tar happens to be about as Sanskrit as it gets actually - تر and तर happen to be cognates that are completely identical (except when used in words like behtar, badtar, kamtar etc. that's obviously Persian).

    The Sanskrit equivalent of tareen is tam
     

    lafz_puchnevala

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    From 'lajwanti' a short story, I have the following 'aksar logoN ke dil meiN khushii thii beshatar ke dil meiN afsos.' Does 'beshatar' here refer to the 'beshtar' being referred to here because that is the way it has been written in Nagari. In that case, can someone just translate the sentence into plain English?

    Thanks!
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Can ziyaadatar and beshtar be used to mean mostly in all contexts or just for most of the time i.e. aksar auqaat? For instance, she mostly i.e. for the most part, baked the cookies for you. In such a sentence would ziyaadatar or beshtar be adequate synonyms for mostly? If so please enlighten me with an example sentence. That would be much appreciated. My mental block is only allowing me to formulate sentences where ziyaadatar is a synonym for often.
     
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