Urdu: Perfect form of jaana = to go?

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urdulearner24

Member
English
In order to improve my Urdu skills I was watching the news in Urdu, and one phrase which got to me was when the presenter said "مر گیا" (mr gia), which means "died". گیا is the perfect form of jaana, and jaana means "to go". Then why is "مر گیا" being used? Shouldn't it be "مر کیا" (mer kia)?
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    urdulearner24 SaaHib/ah. Here you have suggested that the verb "jaanaa" does not mean "to go" but it does, in a way! Let's look at this without using any fancy grammatical terms.

    "honaa" on its own primarily means "to be" and to a much lesser extent "to become"

    "ho jaanaa" = "to go into being", "to become"

    "so jaanaa" = to go into a state of sleep.
    vuh so gayaa = He went to sleep

    "marnaa" = to die

    "mar jaanaa" = to die . But here, one can say that imparts an intensive meaning which is not always easy to bring out in English. One could theoratically say that here the change of state is from being alive, going over to the state of being dead. Apart from "jaanaa", a few other verbs act in this way.

    piinaa = to drip

    vuh pii ga'ii = She drank up.

    kaaTnaa = to cut

    kaaT Daalnaa = to cut up/off

    khaanaa = to eat

    khaa jaanaa = to eat up

    girnaa = to fall

    gir paRnaa = to fall down

    I hope this has been of some help.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    I have a follow-up question on this:

    It is correct to say that any verb could be expressed in the form [verb root] + [conjugated jaanaa]
    (when not having idiomatic meanings, just to convey passiveness, change of state, etc.)

    Or some verbs are simply unthinkable + jaanaa to speakers?
     

    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    I have a follow-up question on this:

    It is correct to say that any verb could be expressed in the form [verb root] + [conjugated jaanaa]
    (when not having idiomatic meanings, just to convey passiveness, change of state, etc.)

    Or some verbs are simply unthinkable + jaanaa to speakers?
    Not to answer your question, but one caveat:
    Passiveness: kiyaa jaanaa
    Change of state and other aspectual/attitudinal nuances: kar jaanaa
    There are two different constructions.
     

    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    What I am asking is if the "nuancing" [verb root]+[conjugated jaana] is, at least in principle, "available/possible" for all verbs, or to the same extent that, say, [verb root]+[conjugated lenaa] / [conjugated denaa] are possible to provide the subjective/objective nuance.

    Or if, on the contrary, [verb root]+[conjugated jaana] is only admissible in comparatively fewer and specific verbs which must be learnt.
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    Well, there is at least one verb root that I think of that probably wouldn't be compounded with jaanaa — the root jaa- itself! Eg, one would never say things like *wo jaa gayaa. I would suspect there are others too.
     
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