Urdu/Persian: ہر کہ آمد براں مزید کرد

iskander e azam

Senior Member
English
Friends,

You will be glad to know I am nearing the end of مولانا صاحب کی book کالا پانی . He is still throwing up problems for me. He uses the Persian proverb used in the heading of this post:

اس سیٹلمنٹ کے دستور العمل اور قواعد ابتدا ء۱۸۵۸ء سے اب تک وقتناً فوقتاً بدلتے رہے ہیں اور ہمیشہ رو بہ سختی و جبر میں اورٍ "ہر کہ آمد براں مزید کرد"پر یہاں خوب عمل ہوتا ہے۔

Chapter 32, p125, ll. 16-17.

For Persian speakers reading this thread: I am reading کالا پانی : تواریخِ عجیب which is the memoir of مولانا محمد جعفر تھانیسری published originally in 1885. I am reading the reprint of 2018 (Jhelum, Pakistan) with a introduction by محمد حامد سراج. Please note all page numbers are from this edition and may not match the edition to which you have access.

What is the literal translation of ہر کہ آمد براں مزید کرد? And what would it mean?

All help appreciated.

Best wishes,

Alex
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    The author is talking about, in Urdu, of the powers to be involved in the on going oppressive and coercive changes to the rules and regulations from 1858 on wards. He sums it up by quoting the Persian line.

    ہر کہ آمد براں مزید کرد "Whoever came, added more to it." Or "Whoever comes, adds more to it". An alternate version is ہر کہ آمد براں مزید نمود

    A similar proverbial saying is ہر کہ آمد عمارتِ نو ساخت "Whoever came made/built a new building."
     
    Last edited:

    iskander e azam

    Senior Member
    English
    The author is talking about, in Urdu, of the powers to be involved in the on going oppressive and coercive changes to the rules and regulations from 1858 on wards. He sums it up by quoting the Persian line.

    ہر کہ آمد براں مزید کرد "Whoever came, added more to it." Or "Whoever comes, adds more to it". An alternate version is ہر کہ آمد براں مزید نمود

    A similar proverbial saying is ہر کہ آمد عمارتِ نو ساخت "Whoever came made/built a new building."
    QP SaaHib,

    The second proverb you gave seems to be suggesting 'that each starts anew'. The way a new Prime Minister would fashion his own course or a new wife would run a household differently. Would you agree with my analysis of it?
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    QP SaaHib,

    The second proverb you gave seems to be suggesting 'that each starts anew'. The way a new Prime Minister would fashion his own course or a new wife would run a household differently. Would you agree with my analysis of it?
    Yes, I would agree.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top