Urdu, Persian and Hindi: Plural of tea i.e. Teas

Sheikh_14

Senior Member
English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
Dear Foreros,

I would be interested to know how you pluralise tea in the languages above. Although chaa'e in Urdu and Hindi is a feminine noun the typical rules of pluralisations do not seem to apply when it comes to the word in that I am yet to ever come across chaa'eiN. Thence how would you say the following:

"They serve as many as 70 different teas"
I like 4 or five teas from their collection, the rest I'd say were highly/grossly overrated.

Regards,
Sheikh
 
  • Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Much appreciated Perso. In Urdu it seems we treat chaa'e as a singular regardless of how much or how many of it we are referring to. Please correct me if my supposition is incorrect? Also is or has the Persianised suffix haa ever used for chaa'e? I've never heard a sentence end in haiN when chaa'e is being referred to.
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    Much appreciated Perso. In Urdu it seems we treat chaa'e as a singular regardless of how much or how many of it we are referring to. Please correct me if my supposition is incorrect?
    I don’t know what you mean here, can you explain please.
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindustani
    I don’t know what you mean here, can you explain please.
    chaa'e / chaay is a frequently a mass noun in Urdu-Hindi (and mass nouns are used in the singular). The word "tea" is usually a mass noun in English too, but one does sometimes encounter the plural form "teas," which indicates that it's being used as a count noun [eg, "He's already had two teas" meaning "He's already had two cups of tea," or (as in the OP) "They have seventy teas" meaning "They have seventy types of tea."] I suppose these kinds of count noun usages of chaa'e / chaay are not as common in Hindi-Urdu, and not really necessary either since you can just use a separate counter and say things like "x cups of tea" or "y types of tea" instead:

    wo do kap chaa'e / chaay pii chukaa hai
    wahaaN sattar taraH kii chaa'e / chaay miltii hai

    But to me at least, it sounds just fine (even if a bit uncommon) to use it as a count noun with standard plural morphology (chaa'e -> chaa'eN / chaay -> chaayeN), and there are indeed a number of occurrences of this kind of usage on the internet as well (at least when I search चायें in Devanagari).
     
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    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    Thank you.

    I have answered the case for Persian, that raised a question which I couldn't understand as it seemed to be addressing Urdu speakers.
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    chaa'e / chaay is a frequently a mass noun in Urdu-Hindi (and mass nouns are used in the singular). The word "tea" is usually a mass noun in English too, but one does sometimes encounter the plural form "teas," which indicates that it's being used as a count noun [eg, "He's already had two teas" meaning "He's already had two cups of tea," or (as in the OP) "They have seventy teas" meaning "They have seventy types of tea."] I suppose these kinds of count noun usages of chaa'e / chaay are not as common in Hindi-Urdu, and not really necessary either since you can just use a separate counter and say things like "x cups of tea" or "y types of tea" instead:

    wo do kap chaa'e / chaay pii chukaa hai
    wahaaN sattar taraH kii chaa'e / chaay miltii hai

    But to me at least, it sounds just fine (even if a bit uncommon) to use it as a count noun with standard plural morphology (chaa'e -> chaa'eN / chaay -> chaayeN), and there are indeed a number of occurrences of this kind of usage on the internet as well (at least when I search चायें in Devanagari).
    Thank you for this. I am yet to come across a time when Urdu-phones refer to chaa'e in its plural form i.e. Chaa'eN. If someone can find a link for otherwise especially in nastaleeq/nasx that would be really helpful.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    chaa'e / chaay is a frequently a mass noun in Urdu-Hindi (and mass nouns are used in the singular). The word "tea" is usually a mass noun in English too, but one does sometimes encounter the plural form "teas," which indicates that it's being used as a count noun [eg, "He's already had two teas" meaning "He's already had two cups of tea," or (as in the OP) "They have seventy teas" meaning "They have seventy types of tea."] I suppose these kinds of count noun usages of chaa'e / chaay are not as common in Hindi-Urdu, and not really necessary either since you can just use a separate counter and say things like "x cups of tea" or "y types of tea" instead:

    wo do kap chaa'e / chaay pii chukaa hai
    wahaaN sattar taraH kii chaa'e / chaay miltii hai

    But to me at least, it sounds just fine (even if a bit uncommon) to use it as a count noun with standard plural morphology (chaa'e -> chaa'eN / chaay -> chaayeN), and there are indeed a number of occurrences of this kind of usage on the internet as well (at least when I search चायें in Devanagari).
    chaa'eN would be fine as a count noun in Urdu just like gaa'e > gaa'eN.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Thank you.

    I have answered the case for Persian, that raised a question which I couldn't understand as it seemed to be addressing Urdu speakers.
    I can understand your pridicament. It is not possible to say with 100% certainty if @Sheikh_14 is addressing you all the way through or whether after thanking you he has moved onto Urdu speakers.
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    chaa'eN would be fine as a count noun in Urdu just like gaa'e > gaa'eN.
    Chaa'eN and Chaa'e it is then mystery resolved 😃. When using chaa'e it would always end in hai, and when succeeding chaa'eN, haiN.

    This case has been pretty much closed however, if anyone would like to take a crack in answering the following feel free to. How would you translate:

    "Sri Lanka houses 20 of the world's finest teas"?

    Perso-phones are welcome to answer the above.

    Other than that is the Persian pluralisation of haa usable in Urdu for this situation as it is with Parlimaan and Riyaasat?

    Apologies Perso, I'll ensure that when drifting to another point I say as much and not keep you wondering.
     
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