Urdu: proud

  • linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    How do you say proud in Urdu? also Panjabi?
    I don't know about the adjective itself, but "to be proud" in Urdu is "fakhar karnaa" (فخر كزنا) (lit. "to do pride").

    In religious contexts, we borrow the Arabic word "takabbur" (تكبر) and someone who is proud is called a "mutakabbir" (متكبر) which is basically the agent noun relating to takabbur (hence "one who is proud")

    Sorry, but I don't know about the Punjabi, although on the top of my head, I'd say they borrow the Urdu :)
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    "I'm proud of you" - MaiN tum par fakhar kartaa hooN
    (The capital N is a nasalised sound, although it doesn't really matter if you don't pronounce them :))

    the "kh" in fakhar is pronounced like the "khaa" (خ) in Arabic.
    Maybe you're not too savvy about Arabic?

    The خ in Arabic is pronounced a bit like when you're clearing your throat :D

    edit - here you go:
    (The two ways I have pronounced it are interchangeable. The first one is how people would normally pronounce it (just like an aspirated "k" sound) but the second one is more accurate and reflects the true pronunciation of the letter خ. Learned people are more likely to pronounce it the second way.
     

    SaritaSarang

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Wow thank you very much for you help (as always!!!) I really appreciate the sound file it helps me so much, as I know almost nothing about pronunciation of middle eastern languages at all. Now I know how to say "Wehmi" and
    "fakhar karnaa" hahaha It's going really slow but little by little right? (p.s- you have a very sweet voice!)
    :D
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Haha no problem at all and thanks for the kind words :)

    I didn't realise it was you who also made the "superstition" thread! :D

    p.s - I agree with you when you say "little by little" - I actually believe it's an effective way of learning a language (instead of formally learning tedious grammar and formal rules). There's a famous linguist calles Steven Krashen who talks about this. (It's actually called the "Stephen Krashen's theory of Second Language Acquisiton") incase you're interested lol. Sorry about the randomness hehe.. just thought I'd mention it.
     

    SaritaSarang

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    That sounds really interesting, does he have anything published that I can read? I'm going to look him up on google lol
     
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