Urdu/Punjabi: waari jaana

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lcfatima

Senior Member
English USA
Can one use the expression waari jaana in Urdu or is this Punjabi?

as in: koi kisi cheez (ya kisi shakhs) pe waari jaana

I am not sure if I am using it correctly here, but I think it is supposed to mean sacrifice.
 
  • BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    "mai.n Sadqay, mai.n waari, mai.n qurbaan" are equivalent phrases. The subject is usually an elder female relative. Heard fairly frequently on the tele, never in real life. Its some kind of expression of excessive affection, but the choice of the words, reasoning, rationale are lost on me.
     

    Illuminatus

    Senior Member
    USA
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    I seem to have heard the phrase <mai.n waari waari jaoon> once or twice (movies).

    Also, there is this song which has a line <mein sadke jawan, oh mein sadke jawan, oh ishq mein yara mein sadke jawan> - It's Rocking

    I guess it is the same sadQe jaana which BP mentioned. Thanks!
     

    lcfatima

    Senior Member
    English USA
    You guys lost me on the cultural reference to the elderly female relative.

    I heard the word in a Punjabi song and asked about it, but the person I asked could not identify it as being used in both languages, plus it for some reason is not in my dictionary. That's why I asked.

    Illuminatus: Is that what they are saying in that song? I must have heard that song a hundred times and never noticed. Songs are especially difficult on non-native ears in terms of comprehension.
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    mai.n sadkey javaa.n - Punjabi and mai.n sadqay mai.n waari [jaaoo.n] - Urdu/Hindi take from the word Sadqa which is the Muslim religious term for charity/alms not tied to any specific occasion. The expression in question therefore means 'May I be sold/given off in charity/sacrificed(qurbaan-ed) for your sake'. Nobody gets sold off, its purely symbolic! waari probably means something like nichhaawar. All imply pretty intense love in the works.
     
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    Illuminatus

    Senior Member
    USA
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    Until today morning, I used to think it is Main sajkey jaana

    After reading this thread, I realized it was sadQe!!!

    And yes, after trying to make sense of French songs, I fully empathize with you!
     

    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Didn't realize it's a qaaf.

    After reading this thread, I realized it was sadQe!!!

    Yes, it is Sadqe صَدقے! Not only a ‘qaaf’ ق but also a ‘Saad’ ص

    صَدقَہ (pl. صَدقے ) = voluntary alms giving


    The root is ص ۔ د ۔ ق , and صَدقَہ (Sadaqah) comes from the verb Sadaqa صَدَقَ = to speak the truth, be sincere.

    Also have:

    صَدَّقَ = to accept as true, deem credible; which gives taSdeeq تصدیق = verification, confirmation - commonly used in Urdu (Hindi?).

    Other derivatives from this root used in Urdu are:

    صَادِق (Saadiq) = صَدُوق (Saduq) = truthful, veracious, sincere; صِدّیق ( Siddeeq ) = righteous; صَدیِق (Sadeeq) = friend; صِدق و صَفا (Siqd o Safaa) = truthfulness and sincerity combined with clarity and transparency; صداقت (Sadaaqat) = sincerity, fidelity

    [Saadiq, Saduq and Siddeeq are proper masculine names.]

    As BP, said:
    واری جانا / ہونا = قربان جانا / ہوجانا =
    صَدقے جانا \ ہونا

    واری and واری جانا / ہونا etc. are found in special kinds of Urdu poetry known as sha’irii-e-bayn o bayaaN (شاعریِ بین و بیاں ) = lamentation poetry.
     
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    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Thank you for your reply, Faylasoof. I recognize many names from your "Saadiq" explanation. Siddiqi is a common South Asian Muslim last name. I've also met several Sadiqs.
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    Siddiqi means descended from Siddiq[ue], a renowned person from the 7th century AD.
     
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    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Can Sadiq also imply a true and devoted friend?

    Yes you can! For example you can say:

    <woh shakhs SaHeeH o Saadiq hai> = That person is sincere and correct - the implication is reliable, sincere and dependable.

    OR

    <meraa dost (Sadeeq) bahut Saadiq hai aur apni Sadaaqat ka thuboot de chukaa hai > = My friend is very sincere and has proved his fidelity & sincerity

    You can also use Saadiq as follows:

    Saaqid-ul-Qaul honaa صَادِق القول ہونا = to be true to one’s word; Saadiq aanaa صَادِق آنا = to come true

    Many names (in many languages) have meanings! The good thing about the vast majority of Arabic (and many Persian) names is that you can workout their meaning just by going thru’ a dictionary. Same is true of many Sanskrit derived names.

    Here words like Saadiq صَادِق etc.(or SaaliH صَالِح , which I dealt with in another thread) are not only used as proper names but also as adjectives, e.g. SaaliH o Saadiq insaan honaa صَادِق وصَالِح انسان ہونا = to be an upright and sincere person.

    Let me add one or two more related things here.

    From the 6th verbal form tasaddaqa تَصَدَّقَ = to give / receive alms (depending on the prepositions used) , we get tasadduq تَصَدُّق = alms. We use this also in Urdu speech, prose and poetry either by itself as a noun, or in combination with a verb -> compound verb: taSadduq utaarnaa / karnaa كرنا / تَصَدُّق اُتارن is like balaayN lena بلائیں لینا - an act many of you would be familiar with, esp. as performed by some of your elders coming and making a gesture with both hands around your head, as if drawing towards themselves any evil that might befall you. The act of taSadduq is performed often at the same time by waving money (or something precious) around your head, usually in a circular motion, before it is given away as an act of charity.

    Apart from waari honaa /karnaa, we also have the simple infinitive waarnaa وارنا = taSadduq honaa تَصَدُّق ہونا = to be a (symbolic) sacrifice, to ‘ransom’ one’s body and /or soul for someone you are intensely devoted to – all with deep symbolism.

    Here are Urdu verses that use both taSadduq karnaa and waarnaa, where the poet reveals his intense devotion to his master /leader آقا

    پر یہ حسرت ہے تصدق ہی اتارے كوئی
    سر پہ آقا كے مری لاش وارے كوئی

    par yeh Hasrat hai taSadduq hi utaare koi
    sar pah aaqaa ke meri laash waare koi

    Muhibb (Lackhnavi)
     
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    Faylasoof

    Senior Member
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    ... Siddiqi is a common South Asian Muslim last name. I've also met several Sadiqs.

    Here is a little extra:
    Just as BP says Siqqiqi / Siddeeqee / Siddiqi (صِدّیقی ) have a 7th century ancestor.

    PG, I guess they are Saadiqs /Sadiqs and presumably not Sadiqee (صادقی).

    There are also Saadiqee / Sadiqee (صادقی). I don’t think you have many of those in Indo-Pak, but we know a number of Iraqis and also Iranians who are. They also have a very old lineage and are part of a much larger group called ‘saadaatسادات (plural of ‘syedسیّد), which also goes back to the 7th century. In fact, syeds = saadaat are descendents of our prophet through his daughter, Fatimah فَاطِمَہ. In Indo-Pak the most abundant group of syeds are Zaidi syeds. Others include, Alavi / Alvi, Rizvi (sometimes Razavi / Rizavi etc.), Naqvi, Abidi (phonetically Aabidi), Musavi etc. I assume you have met / heard of some of these too.
    Just like many Siqqiqi / Siddeeqee / Siddiqi ( صِدّیقی ) families, many saadaat families cannot fully document their lineage, though some apparently can.

    BTW, the most famous Indian saadaat were the 17th and 18th century saadaat-e-baahirah ساداتِ باھِرہ clans (the Wiki entry uses variant spellings, all of which are a corruption of this), located near Muzaffarnagar, whose scions included the two Syed / Saiyid Brothers called the <King Makers> [One cannot vouch for a complete accuracy of the points made in this article.]
     

    BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    PG, I guess they are Saadiqs /Sadiqs and presumably not Sadiqee (صادقی).
    I think he meant Saadiq as a first name.


    ...In Indo-Pak the most abundant group of syeds are Zaidi syeds. Others include, Alavi / Alvi, Rizvi (sometimes Razavi / Rizavi etc.), Naqvi, Abidi (phonetically Aabidi), Musavi etc.I assume you have met / heard of some of these too.
    The J'afaries and the Kazmis would be feeling so left out!

    Since you've already made the thread digress, let me take some more liberties. I have a question: why do people from the family living in India look somewhat Indian, and those in CARs/NW Pakistan somewhat Mongolish even when they have the shajra-e-nasab to show? Is it the climate? The food? This has had me puzzled since long.
     
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