Urdu: Transliteration of Urdu plural words with ع

Qureshpor

Senior Member
Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
Friends,

مصرع could be transliterated as misra3. How would you transliterate مصرعے? Same for موقعے. I think there are other words that end in 3 which would fall in this category.

aur jaate jaate..sab dostoN ko Divali kii badhaa'ii. merii xvaahish hai kih aap kaa yih din xushiyoN se bharaa hu'aa ho!
 
  • BP.

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    We might be able do that about by simply following what long and short vowels there are, e.g. miSra3ee and mauqa3ee.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    ^ shukriyah, BP SaaHib. lekin kyaa aap ke xayaal meN yih transliteration Urdu talaffuz kii saHiiH 3akkaasii kartii hai?
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    We might be able do that about by simply following what long and short vowels there are, e.g. miSra3ee and mauqa3ee.
    I find it a good suggestion.

    ^ shukriyah, BP SaaHib. lekin kyaa aap ke xayaal meN yih transliteration Urdu talaffuz kii saHiiH 3akkaasii kartii hai?
    mere nazdiik transliteration aur transcription do alag chiizeN hotii haiN.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I find it a good suggestion.

    mere nazdiik transliteration aur transcription do alag chiizeN hotii haiN.
    What you say is true, no doubt.

    Think about how we write and transliterate words ending in "h", e.g.

    jumlah (sg) >> jumle (pl)

    pardah (sg) >> parde (pl)..etc

    You will not have failed to notice that the "h" drops out in the plural. Perhaps we could apply the same logic in the plurals of words such as:

    misra3, mauqa3 etc >> misre, mauqe

    Just a thought, accepting that we would n't be able to miss the 3 in Urdu writing.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    [-h] drops indeed in plural and oblique as well and the reason for it is that the final [-h] functions as a grapheme but not as phoneme.

    Considering that 3ayn, although percentage-wise scarcely pronounced as such, it does always show its right of existence by changing the pronunciation of preceding vowel (3+i=short 'e'; 3+=aa, etc.) and also by being pronounced as a consonant but not by all.

    Therefore the situation appears to be different. On top of that, people who happen to be conversant in Urdu or be learning it but not familiar with its own script, and I know that you know there are millions of them, especially in India, when using the transcription mixed with transliteration would have their jaw fallen on seeing مصرعے which they would be used to transcribe as ''misre''. They would think what the heck is this monster? Above all I am not sure about this but perhaps 3ayn counts for the metre in Urdu poetry.
     
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