Urdu vs Punjabi: waasite

Sheikh_14

Senior Member
English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
Dear Foreros,

Whilst it is abundantly clear that in Punjabi waasite is used in several ways be it to mean for the sake of, on behalf of an animate or inanimate object/inflicting a feeling/entity etc in Urdu it largely is used to refer on behalf of a living entity. For instance, I am crystal clear on that fact that Xudaa-waasite/Xudaa ke waasite is definitely used in Urdu, can the same be said for inanimate feelings/actions instead of beings I.e. Daraane waasite which would mean for the sake of scaring someone/something off? Waasite is frequently used in such a manner in Punjabi, though whether or not that is the case in Urdu is a moot point at least for me. In other words can it be used as a substitute for ke liye and kii xaatir, as it most certainly is in Punjabi?

Secondly, can waasite be used immediately before the noun or must it at all times be followed by ke. In Punjabi that is obviously not the case, but Punjabi is generally a less structured and more flexible language that lends itself to being stretched as one sees fit. It's perfectly acceptable to say x waasite or x de/daa waasite in Punjabi. I was wondering if the same was the case in Urdu.

For instance for the sake of education could be either:

Ta'leem waasite or Ta'leem de waasite in Punjabi.

Perhaps in Urdu, it would be seen as a gross omission, not entirely sure, without the ke, which reminds me a lot of the Italian di which features rather dogmatically.

Is the ke in between waasite and the following noun ever redundant and ommitable?

Regards,
Sheikh
 
  • Gop

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Dear Foreros,

    Whilst it is abundantly clear that in Punjabi waasite is used in several ways be it to mean for the sake of, on behalf of an animate or inanimate object/inflicting a feeling/entity etc in Urdu it largely is used to refer on behalf of a living entity. For instance, I am crystal clear on that fact that Xudaa-waasite/Xudaa ke waasite is definitely used in Urdu, can the same be said for inanimate feelings/actions instead of beings I.e. Daraane waasite which would mean for the sake of scaring someone/something off? Waasite is frequently used in such a manner in Punjabi, though whether or not that is the case in Urdu is a moot point at least for me. In other words can it be used as a substitute for ke liye and kii xaatir, as it most certainly is in Punjabi?

    Secondly, can waasite be used immediately before the noun or must it at all times be followed by ke. In Punjabi that is obviously not the case, but Punjabi is generally a less structured and more flexible language that lends itself to being stretched as one sees fit. It's perfectly acceptable to say x waasite or x de/daa waasite in Punjabi. I was wondering if the same was the case in Urdu.

    For instance for the sake of education could be either:

    Ta'leem waasite or Ta'leem de waasite in Punjabi.

    Perhaps in Urdu, it would be seen as a gross omission, not entirely sure, without the ke, which reminds me a lot of the Italian di which features rather dogmatically.

    Is the ke in between waasite and the following noun ever redundant and ommitable?

    Regards,
    Sheikh
    Concerning your use of an unintelligible word ‘foreros’ may I draw your attention to the following discussion showing what other forum members experienced (including me):
    foreros [forero: wordreference's FAQ]
     

    Gop

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    -ero is a Spanish suffix akin to -vaalaa in Hindi, Urdu, Pubjabi, etc.
    -eros is the plural
    Monsieur Gonzalito, I was referring to the remarks of a forum member in the link I cited, and I cite below those remarks concerning ‘foreros’:
    “...That is not the same think as being as intelligible and as courteous as possible to your readers.”
    Like another forum member asked in that link, I might ask: what is ‘foreros’ doing in a forum for Indo-Iranian languages?
     
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