Usage of 'ensue'

< Previous | Next >

Hinata Sama

Senior Member
Chinese
I have looked up in the dictionary.I don't know if I am right,but I think there are only two usages of 'ensue'.
1.Something happens and then,something ensues
2.Somethings ensues from something

So please take a look at the following sentence.

a common feature of the work presented was the implication
that from a genuine interrogation of the continental tradition necessarily
ensues a repudiation of the orthodoxies symptomatic of that tradition’s
conceptual exhaustion.

Do the one who wrote this sentence use 'ensue' correctly?

<< New questions need their own threads. >>
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I wish philosophers would learn to write in English instead of garbled nonsense. I suppose it's their way of hiding the futility of what they do from the rest of us.

    Yes "ensue" is used correctly.

    The author says that a repudiation ensues from a genuine interrogation.
     

    Hinata Sama

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I wish philosophers would learn to write in English instead of garbled nonsense. I suppose it's their way of hiding the futility of what they do from the rest of us.

    Yes "ensue" is used correctly.

    The author says that a repudiation ensues from a genuine interrogation.
    Is that really true?
    Because according to what you said,
    I assume 'a repudiation ensues from a genuine interrogation' = 'From a genuine interrogation ensues repudiation'
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'A repudiation ensues from a genuine interrogation' = 'From a genuine interrogation ensues a repudiation'

    Yes. The above two sentences are precisely equivalent in meaning.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top