usage of "pull out"

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csg337

New Member
Korean
When I wrote a sentence like
"I made a reservation to pull out my last wisdom tooth yesterday, and the dentist pulled it out today. "

then, editor changed it as below,
"I made an appointment to pull my last wisdom tooth out yesterday, and the dentist pulled it out today."

<<Second and third question removed>>
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    We just usually use the word appointment for all things medical, and use reservation for things more related to fun, like holidays and theatre trips!

    Actually, I dont agree with the appointment to pull my last wisdom tooth out yesterday bit --- since you are not doing the pulling yourself, you need to say "to have my wisdom tooth pulled out. Further more "extracted" is the word most commonly used there.
     
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    utinam

    New Member
    English - American
    I agree with the above comment on both counts. You aren't pulling your tooth, the dentist is, so it should either be, "I made an appointment to have my last wisdom tooth pulled out..." or change the verb entirely and go, "...to have my last wisdom tooth extracted..." You still need the "have" in there, since it segues into the next part of the sentence with the dentist as the subject.
     

    Welshie

    Senior Member
    England, English
    We just usually use the word appointment for all things medical, and use reservation for things more related to fun, like holidays and theatre trips!
    I am not sure this is the fundamental reason behind the use of reservation and appointment. An appointment is a time, agreed on by two parties, to meet each other at that time. A reservation is when you request that someone keep something back for you, that he would have otherwise given to someone else.

    You make a reservation at the theatre to ask them to keep your seat. The same thing for holidays, bus trips, hotels etc. You make an appointment, to see the doctor, the psychiatrist, your boss, the queen, etc, to discuss with them, not so that they hold something for you. (you could say that an appointment is a specific instance of a reservation, when it refers to someone keeping back time to spend with you ;))
     

    LaGriega

    Member
    Greek
    After being rejected and my new thread's been disrespectfully deleted I pop in here to ask

    if there's another use of pull out.

    I've heard somebody use is as 'want to have sex' and I found it kind of weird.

    Is that so?Can we use it in that sense?

    Cheers
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    There was doubtless a reason for the deletion.

    However, can you put "pull out" into a sentence, so we can see the context?
     

    LaGriega

    Member
    Greek
    Thank you for your reply.

    I believe a word is always a word no matter what the meaning(if it is a bad word or not)needs to be expained :) We get in here to learn.

    I can't remember the context really only the verb either pull or pull out and since I've never heard it in my life just curious to find out.Do you use it in the Uk with that particular meaning?

    Thanks again
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I have given you links below to Dictionary.com and urbandicitonary.com. Please bookmark them and use them
    Pull

    Pull
    see meanings 1 and 2
    Pull out see meaning 1 - 5

    I believe a word is always a word no matter what the meaning. And you would be wrong. Even in Greek there are words that have many meanings; we cannot list them all.

    I can't remember the context really only the verb either pull or pull out. Then why would you assume a sexual connotation?;)
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    After being rejected and my new thread's been disrespectfully deleted I pop in here to ask if there's another use of pull out.

    I've heard somebody use is as 'want to have sex' and I found it kind of weird.

    Is that so?Can we use it in that sense?

    Cheers
    I doubt that your thread was disrespectfully deleted. It may have been deleted, but our moderators are usually respectful even when they find it necessary to delete threads that do not conform to the posted forum rules. Is it possible that you meant to use a different word?

    The only sexual meaning of "pull out" I have ever heard was in reference to withdrawal before ejaculation to prevent pregnancy. That doesn't fit the definition of "want to have sex." However, you may be confusing "pull out" with "put out." A woman is sometimes said to "put out" when she gives in to a man's desire for sex.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Also "pulling" is UK slang for "successfully cruising." When you pull, you find a partner in a bar or club and get him/her to put out. In certain contexts, you or s/he may then pull out at some point during the whole procedure.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I've never seen pull out used as a sexual thing. To pull is a well-known phrase for someone securing a companion on a night out, which might lead to sex, I suppose.

    Here is another usage of pull for you:
    I saw the way your thread was pulled and it was not at all disrespectful. The reason was clearly explained to you about the way the forum works for the benefit of ALL its users. I can assure you we have a good awareness of the needs of learners in here.
     
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