Use/have the mullet haircut

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keramus

Senior Member
Persian
Hello everybody

I want to say:
In the past, many men had the mullet haircut.
In the past, many men used the mullet haircut.

444047_836.jpg

I think the first sentence sounds more natural in English but I'm not sure because I'm not a native English speaker.
Which sentence is correct?
Thanks.
 
  • You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Hello everybody

    I want to say:
    In the past, many men had the mullet haircut.
    In the past, many men used the mullet haircut.

    View attachment 17945

    I think the first sentence sounds more natural in English but I'm not sure because I'm not a native English speaker.
    Which sentence is correct?
    Thanks.
    In the past many men had a mullet haircut.

    In the past many/[a lot of] guys had a mullet might be another more natural option. :)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I don't know how far in the past that was, but it must have passed me by because I had no idea what a "mullet" might be, apart from the fish of course. I may not be the only one, so I think it's best to keep "haircut" in the equation.

    I like Ylr's first suggestion best:)- or maybe in the plural: "...lots of men had/used to have mullet haircuts".
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I don't know how far in the past that was, but it must have passed me by because I had no idea what a "mullet" might be, apart from the fish of course. I may not be the only one, so I think it's best to keep "haircut" in the equation.

    I like Ylr's first suggestion best:)- or maybe in the plural: "...lots of men had/used to have mullet haircuts".
    You don't remember them, vel? :D

    Mullet (haircut) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The mullet is a hairstyle that is short at the front and sides and long in the back. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, use of the term mullet to describe this hairstyle was "apparently coined, and certainly popularized, by U.S. hip-hop group the Beastie Boys",[1] who used "mullet" and "mullet head" as epithets in their 1994 song "Mullet Head".
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I know about red mullet and grey mullet, but not the hairy sort. But then I don't follow men's hair fashions.:rolleyes: Thanks for the Wikipedia link (especially intriguing for me was the bit about "ancient mullets").
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I agree with using "a" instead of "the". We could say "wear" instead of "have". And since in most cultures men don't wear fish on their heads, I don't think "haircut"is necessary, at least not in the States. "Mullet" over,veli...
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    OK guys, I accept that I may be the only person in the English-speaking world never to have heard of this hairstyle, but the proposed version: In the past many/[a lot of] guys had a mullet doesn't actually mention HAIR or HEAD.:D


    Edited: changed position of "never"
     
    Last edited:

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    OK guys, I accept that I may be the only person in the English-speaking world to have never heard of this hairstyle, but the proposed version: In the past many/[a lot of] guys had a mullet doesn't actually mention HAIR or HEAD.:D
    There's no need to mention 'hair' or 'head', vel, because those of us in the know would not automatically think "fish - large tank- living room" or "fish - fridge - dinner tonight". :D
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I'd say the hairsyle is the default definition; if it meant anything else, or if the context weren't piscine, most of us would assume this is what it meant.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    But we weren't given any context.
    In the past, many guys had a mullet... for lunch, lightly grilled; now they often can't even afford a tin of sardines.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    most of us would assume this is what it meant
    I rather think not. You are not alone, veli. I would never (until very recently (*)) have associated the word mullet with a haircut. Men in the 1970s just had long hair, it didn't (as far as I was aware) have a name.

    (*) I did actually come across it by chance about a year ago on a youtube video of some stand-up comedienne who suggested that if you were a lesbian looking to connect with another, you should go to clubs sporting a "side mullet", which apparently sends the appropriate signals.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    In the past, many/[a lot of] guys used to sport a mullet is another option that might make it a little more obvious that we're not talking about the limbless, cold-blooded vertebrate animal with gills and fins that lives in water that vel used to cook, lightly grilled for her friends, the ones that now can barely afford to buy a tin of sardines! :)
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Good on ya, sport!

    In BE, to "sport" a hat or a haircut sounds faintly old-fashioned or else jocular (in this case mildly mocking perhaps). I prefer the OP's "had" (or "used to have") a mullet haircut. At least, I see no reason to change it.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Mullet is one of those words that a good percentage of your readers will know; I am in agreement with london calling. Those who don't know a mullet is also a hairstyle will have to imagine a fish or go to a dictionary, and nothing wrong with that.
     
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