Use of “subete” without “no” to modify a noun

Imetsi

New Member
French
Comparing the Japanese translation of a French book with the original, I came across the sentence "subete buyou wa honrai seitekina mono deatta" which renders "Toutes les danses ont été sacrées à l'origine" (All dances were originally sacred). Is there a difference in meaning between "subete" used alone, as it is the case here, and "subete no" or are both structures interchangeable? Thanks in advance.
 
  • SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    subete no (all) = the function of this is an adjective to modify the noun "buyou"

    subete (completely, with no exception) = the function of this is an adverb to modify the verbal portion, "seitekinamonodatta"

    And they are interchangeable without changing the nuance or the meaning in this context, but it may become different in some other contexts.

    "subete buyou wa honrai seitekina mono deatta"
    ="buyou wa honrai subete seitekina mono deatta"
    ="subete no buyou wa honrai seitekina mono deatta"

    By the way, "giseitekina (犠牲的な)" is something about sacrifice, and "seitekina (性的な)
    " is something that has sexual connotation. 
    Maybe it was typo for "sinseina (神聖な)” or "religious" "sacred" "holy."

    All of the three may make sense, but I wonder what was correct in your context.
     
    Last edited:

    frokat

    Member
    English - US
    I think it’s 「聖的」 - maybe 聖なる would be preferable if it’s ever read aloud.
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I think it’s 「聖的」 - maybe 聖なる would be preferable if it’s ever read aloud.
    :thumbsup:
    I see. Thanks!
    It makes sense.

    Yet, 聖的な(seitekina) still seems funny to me. I've never seen this expression before.
     
    Last edited:

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    It is now a noun but subete was originally the te-form of the verb suberu, or to bind, to wrap up, or to sum up. So, "Subete buyō-wa" is literally, "summing up, dances are." The no-less version sounds a bit stiff, but the difference is slight.
     
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