@ (use to mean "at")

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by worldsigner, Nov 7, 2013.

  1. worldsigner Senior Member

    Minnesota, USA
    US - English
    I often translate things in English that use @ for "at", for example "@ 3:00" or "@ the school." I always end up just writing the whole phrase, "a las 3:00" or "en la escuela."

    Is there an equivalent use of @ to mean a specific word in Spanish?
     
  2. DrMiguel01 Senior Member

    Louisiana, USA
    Latin American Spanish
    Dear worldsigner:

    First, yes; you are right, in both cases. In English, the idea is "make it as short as possible." In Spanish the idea is "make it as precise as possible."

    Second, no; there is one single specific word in Spanish, either for the @ or for "at." Depends on the context.

    Have a good day.

    Please, always double check my English.
     
  3. worldsigner Senior Member

    Minnesota, USA
    US - English
    Thanks for your response. Yes, I understand that. I was wondering if @ was ever used in place of a word in Spanish. In texting or other situations?
     
  4. levmac Senior Member

    Spain
    British English
    The word in English has more flexibility, because "at" is a prepositon. In Spanish, it's "arroba" so it can't take the place of a word.

    But! It can be used online instead of o/a.

    Busco compañero/a del piso = Busco compañer@ del piso.
     
  5. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spain. Left four years ago
    Hello.

    The @ (arroba) is not a linguistic symbol in Spanish. If needed (e.g. for a text message), I could abbreviate it as, for example: 3:00 (en) escuela.
    Some people use it but it's not correct. DPD (género):
    Saludos.
     
  6. levmac Senior Member

    Spain
    British English
    Hence my use the qualifier "online". For that matter, the use of "@" in English is not formally correct either.
     
  7. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spain. Left four years ago
    Levmac, unfortunately, @ is not only wrongly used online. In general, I recommend not to use @ for o/a in Spanish.
     
  8. Miguel Antonio Senior Member

    Galicia
    Galego (Rías Baixas)
    Yes, it was. A long time ago, in a measuring system far, far away from the current metric one; though not in texting.

    Oh yes it can, or used to at least: the word arroba (what a coincidence!), a measuring unit of times past.
     
  9. levmac Senior Member

    Spain
    British English
    I don't think that what was the original poster was asking. "@" to mean "at 3 o'lock" is a symbol being used as a word, and I was providing an example of where it is used online as a time-saver, muck like it is in English. Saying "@" is used to mean (original poster's words) "arroba" in Spanish is like saying "@" is used to mean "ampersat" in English.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2013

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