used to wait out here on this when her friends would come over

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
A mother sends her children Becca and Tyler to their grandparents at the house where she grew up. Now they are by their mother's tree swing when she was a child. Becca is filming everything.
BECCA: Okay, on camera, tell us what Mom told you.
TYLER: She used to wait out here on this when her friends would come over.
The Visit, movie

"On this" obviously means "on this swing".

But I wonder about the grammar. I mean the when-clause. How does it connect with the main clause?

1. She used to wait out here on this, thinking: "When will my friends come over?"

2. It's a usual pattern and the when-clause is a usual time clause: "She used to wait out here on this when her friends would come over." ("would" indicating habitual actions in the past")

What option works here, what do you think?
Thanks.
 
  • Katherine Blacksword

    New Member
    English
    Loob is right if you study the sentence closely you will notice the words from Tyler that say "She(Meaning their mom) used to wait out here when her friends would come over".So it would have to be past tense do you get it now?
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I think it has to be (2), Vic.
    And is it clear that she was waiting for her friends to come over (not for something else)? Because it sounds a little odd, don't you find?:)
    Loob is right if you study the sentence closely you will notice the words from Tyler that say "She(Meaning their mom) used to wait out here when her friends would come over".So it would have to be past tense do you get it now?
    I get it, but the question was about the usage of "when":)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    And is it clear that she was waiting for her friends to come over (not for something else)? Because it sounds a little odd, don't you find?
    Well, I suppose it's clear. But the syntax doesn't say that, exactly. It says that
    - when her friends would come over
    - she would wait on the swing.
    Logically, but not syntactically, she was waiting for her friends to come;).
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Well, I suppose it's clear. But the syntax doesn't say that, exactly. It says that
    - when her friends would come over
    - she would wait on the swing.
    Logically, but not syntactically, she was waiting for her friends to come;).
    Yes, we can derive from the OP that there was some planned time when the friends were supposed to come, and so she went out and waited for them.

    I think that would be better expressed by this:
    She used to wait out here on this when her friends would were going to come over.

    Or by this:
    She used to wait out here on this when for her friends would to come over.

    The OP sounds like -- as soon as her friends came over she would sit on the swing and waited for them:eek:

    Do you agree?:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, I don't think anyone would misinterpret the original.

    But both your rewrites are very good English!:thumbsup::)
     
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