used to

sunsail

Senior Member
de langue Turc
Hello,
If someone says this,does he still smoke?

I used to smoke in my 20's.
I was used to smoking in my 20's.

Thanks
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The two statements are not equivalent and neither is definitive about the current state of the habit, although the first might suggest it.
     

    Infininja

    Senior Member
    American English
    In the first case, no. He smoked in the past but does not smoke any more.

    The second one is a little ambiguous. As it is it could mean he smoked regularly then, but does not say much about the future.

    Edit: sdgraham:

    Would you say the first at least implies there was a stopping point if he does smoke now?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I used to smoke in my 20's.
    Probably doesn't smoke now... but you would also say this if you stopped in your 30s and resumed in your 40s and were puffing away as you said it while you elaborated on your smoking history. (Ok, you can forget that unlikely scenario.) :)

    I was used to smoking in my 20's.
    This means you were accustomed to smoking in your 20s.
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    In the first case, no. He smokes in the past but does not smoke any more.

    The second one is a little ambiguous. As it is it could mean he smoked regularly then, but does not say much about the future.
    In the second condition,some addicted stops smoking and then starts smoking over the time,not committed to his promise?
     

    MichaelW

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    "I used to smoke in my 20's" refers only to my 20's as past, it doesn't necessarily say anything about the present. I could go on, "I gave it up for a few years but now I have started again".

    "I was used to" is an archaic way of saying "it was my custom to" or similar but doesn't really work here.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The differences have been explained.
    The first sentence is natural English ... you might hear it any time that smoking is discussed.
    The second sentence is very odd. Although correct, I have never heard anyone say anything like it.
     
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