using 'PR' as a verb

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dec-sev

Senior Member
Russian
Hello.
Do you use the 'PR" (in the sense of gaining publicity) as a verb?
Can I say
XXX (name of the company) donate money to charities, but they don't do it because they are so kind but to PR themselves.
or
XXX (name of a politician) managed to PR himself at a TV show yesterday (meaning he managed to make a good impression on the viewers)
or
XXX (name of a company engaged in PR technologies) are very good at PRing politicians
?
I'm asking this because 'PR' has found its place in the Russian language and we often use this word the way like in the examples above (I mean colloquially).
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think one reason English is a world language is because it's malleable, so if it's common where you are I don't see too much reason to avoid it. But if you're taking it outside Russia, you should probably avoid it – "we" don't use it that way. :)
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thanks for the advise, Copy.
    One more question. The way we :) use 'to PR' sometimes has negative connotations, a sort of gaining cheap publicity.
    An example. Some two weeks ago a Spanish TV channel reported on a theft of a valuable picture. It had been stolen from a museum or from a cathedral, I can't remember. Later police found it and the Spanish prime-minister Mariano Rajoy handed it over to the director of the museum. It's clear no merit was due to Rajoy still it was he who took part in the ceremony. So, the phrase ''the man just PRed himself" in this context in Russian would bear a good portion of contempt. My question is how to express this idea in English. The only expression I know is 'cheap publicity' but I'm not sure if it's widely used.
     

    stormwreath

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "He just did it for cheap publicity" would be a perfectly good way to express that idea in UK English.

    "It was just an exercise in self-promotion" or "It was just a publicity stunt" would also be common.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    You can't use (and we don't use) "PR" as a verb in English, because it's an abbreviation for public relations, and that phrase isn't a verb. The related verb is publicize.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You can't use (and we don't use) "PR" as a verb in English, because it's an abbreviation for public relations, and that phrase isn't a verb.
    That may not be the best argument -- private message isn't a verb but we tell people to PM us. :)
     
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