using the noun "case in point"

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jj88

Senior Member
English, US
How would you use "case in point" in a sentence? In that sentence, the whole phrase, "case in point," would be considered a noun. Is that correct?

Here's an exaple sentence,
The best way for me to show you how it works is to offer a case in point.

Is that a grammatically correct sentence?

Thanks.
 
  • river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    "A case in point is an example which shows that what you are saying is true or helps to explain why you are saying it: - Lack of communication causes serious problems and their marriage is a case in point."
     

    bpipoly

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Your sample sentence is grammatically correct but rather awkward out of context. It is usually used to indicate that a relevant example is coming or has just been given.

    For example,

    High concentrations of poor and indigent people often leads to riots by local youth to vent their frustration. A case in point of this social phenomenon is the recent riots in the suburbs of France. In France, working class citizens, including many immigrants, are concentrated in the public housing ...

    or

    The Watts Riots of are a case in point of what can happen when a minority group is ignored and repressed long enough and feel they have not other course of action.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    jj88 said:
    How would you use "case in point" in a sentence? In that sentence, the whole phrase, "case in point," would be considered a noun. Is that correct?

    Here's an exaple sentence,
    The best way for me to show you how it works is to offer a case in point.

    Is that a grammatically correct sentence?

    Thanks.
    I think you should just say "an example." Without context, I can only guess but I'm sure that could also replaced by a number of more descriptive phrases that are more specific and avoid the trite "case in point." For example, you could say "such a scenario," "supporting evidence," or something like that. It all depends on what exactly you are trying to give an example of.
     

    Yang

    Senior Member
    Taiwan /Traditional Chinese
    jj88 said:
    How would you use "case in point" in a sentence? In that sentence, the whole phrase, "case in point," would be considered a noun. Is that correct?
    Do you mean something like the following passage?
    I saw it somewhere several days ago and am not sure whether 'a case in point' should be regarded as a noun phrase or 'a case' is a noun phrase modified by 'in point'.

    ----
    A case in point is how Western culture inherited a combination of myths
    from the Greeks, whose fertile imagination had interpreted natural and
    spiritual events in an animistic and anthropomorphic way. Plato described
    mythos as a tale revolving around gods, divine beings, heroes, and those
    returned from the afterlife. This was opposed to logos, the typical
    rational argumentation of philosophical speculation. A myth is, therefore,
    a story or a series of tales that has often reached us in a fragmentary way.

    ----
    Tom's career is a case in point (=a clear example of something that you are discussing or explaining).----from LONGMAN online dictionary
     
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