Using the trap

< Previous | Next >

Henares

Senior Member
Polish
Hi,
In the game Lara Croft GO there is a level titled “Using the trap”. It’s a puzzle adventure game and as you probably know Lara Croft is an archaeologist who explores ancients ruins etc. Of course after having watched the Indiana Jones series we all know that such places are full of traps :)

How do you think - why do the authors decided to use the idefinite article since I as a player don’t know what trap they mean when I see the title screen for the first time?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's also puzzling why they use 'using'. If you don't know what's there, you can't think of using it yet. It's a bit like titling a level 'Lara gets attacked by a tiger' or 'Avoid the falling boulders'. It seems to go against the spirit of the adventure.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    there is a level titled “Using the trap”
    why do the authors decided to use the idefinite article
    Most traps in the game (or any game) can hurt the player, but the player cannot use the trap to help them.

    Apparently this level of the game has one trap that Lara can use. By telling you that Lara can "use the trap", they are giving you a hint. They are telling you that Lara can use one trap on this level. If they didn't hint, many players would not figure it out. A trap you can use? Who would ever think of that?

    But they could give you the same hint by calling this level "Using a trap". You would still know that one trap could be used to help Lara.

    To me, both titles sound natural. Using "the" in this way sounds perfectly natural to me. But I can't explain it. I don't have a set of grammar rules for every way that "the" is used in English.
     
    Last edited:

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But presumably she will soon be using the trap. I'm sure if you wait a bit, and play the level, it will all make sense.

    It's worth remembering that titles don't have to conform to 'normal' grammatical 'rules', and that they are often there to intrigue the reader, or engage the reader's interest in some way. If it makes you wonder "What trap? How will I have to use it?", it's done its job. It's grabbed your interest, and you will go on to play . . .

    Crossed with dojibear, who makes a good point.
     

    Henares

    Senior Member
    Polish
    To be more precise it turns out that it’s the same kind of trap that was presented in the previous level, but this time the puzzles that require using those traps are more complex.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top