Using the word "composition"

Albertovna

Senior Member
Russian - Russia
Dear all,

I thought the word "composition" (chemical, mineral, whatever makeup) could be used only in the word combination "be of such-and-such composition." Now I see sentences like this on the Internet:

(1) Which planet has a composition similar to the Sun?
(2) The nucleic substances also show a composition of this sort.
(3) The term basalt is at times applied to shallow intrusive rocks with a composition typical of basalt.

Are they correct? (Now I suspect that they are all correct).
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes, they're all correct:thumbsup: There's nothing particularly unusual about the word composition, that I know of:)
     

    Albertovna

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    Dear all,

    Please consider this sentence, which I took from wiki.answers.com:

    Which planet has a composition similar to the Sun?

    Can we say so? To my mind, the segment in bold contains a logical mistake, and it should be "a composition similar to that of the Sun." This is because we compare two compositions, not a composition and the Sun. Am I right?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Did you not see my previous answer, Albertovna?:confused::confused:

    composition similar to the Sun is one of those things that people argue over. Some will insist that it should be either:
    similar to that of the Sun (as you say)
    or
    similar to the Sun's.

    However, a lot of other people won't insist that:)
     

    Albertovna

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    I did, but now I am asking a different question.
    As far as I understand you,
    similar to the Sun :tick:
    similar to that of the Sun :tick:
    similar to the Sun's :tick:
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Well, a lot of people would say the first one is wrong. I'd advise you to use the second or third version, to be on the safe side:)
     
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