Using 'to' or 'for'

diogerepus

Senior Member
Korean
Are both of these two sentences correct?
If they are correct, how are they different in meaning?

I'm trying to give this to my neighbor.
I'm trying to give this for my neighbor.
 
  • oileanach_75

    Member
    English/Gaeilge - Ireland
    diogerepus said:
    Are both of these two sentences correct?
    If they are correct, how are they different in meaning?

    I'm trying to give this to my neighbor.
    I'm trying to give this for my neighbor.
    I'm trying to give this to my neighbour - this is the only sentence that makes sence to me.
     

    oileanach_75

    Member
    English/Gaeilge - Ireland
    I suppose that you could look at it like this

    use 'to' to show that you are parting with some thing

    e.g. I am giving this new pot plat to my neighbour. I am forwarding these booklets on to my neighbour. I will pass this information on to my neighbour, etc

    use 'for' ti show that you are looking after it

    e.g. I am holding on to the letters for my neighbour as he/she is away on holidays. I am saving this piece of cake for my neighbour as he/she asked me to.
     

    piraña utria

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombian with Caribbean nuanc
    Hello my friends.

    I think I’ve understood this point, but speaking about this topic, I’ve recently listened, by one of my teachers -a no-native one- a bit different position.

    Among the context of an informal conversation with a friend, as I’m pointing out a pencil which could be the accurate preposition of these ones:

    1. This is for you.

    2. This one is to you.

    I’d prefer a more elaborated sentence in any case, but I’m wondering right now just about which of highlighted word is the grammatically correct in the text above.

    Thanks in advance for your answers,
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    :arrow: Response to post #6.
    I think I’ve understood this point, but speaking about this topic, I’ve recently listened heard, by from one of my teachers -a non-native one- a bit different position.

    Among In the context of an informal conversation with a friend, as I’m pointing out a pencil which could be the accurate preposition of these ones:

    1. This is for you. :tick:

    2. This one is to you. :cross:
    [....]
    This is for with the meaning: 2. "intended to belong to ...." Dictionary.com

    The preposition to is more likely to be used with verbs implying motion: "I give/ hand/ pass/ the pencil to you."
    However, English prepositions are tricky, as we know, and this rule may not cover all cases.
     

    piraña utria

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombian with Caribbean nuanc
    :arrow: Response to post #6.


    This is for with the meaning: 2. "intended to belong to ...." Dictionary.com

    The preposition to is more likely to be used with verbs implying motion: "I give/ hand/ pass/ the pencil to you."
    However, English prepositions are tricky, as we know, and this rule may not cover all cases.
    Hi Cagey.

    Thanks for your explanation and corrections either.

    Regards,
     

    Waterdash

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    Are both of these two sentences correct?
    If they are correct, how are they different in meaning?

    I'm trying to give this to my neighbor.
    I'm trying to give this for my neighbor.
    Ok, I don't know if any of you guys meant to say it like this, but this is what you are saying diogerepus in each sentence:

    I'm trying to give this to my neighbor.
    You are giving something to the neighbor

    I'm trying to give this for my neighbor.
    This is incorrect. It is saying that you are giving this, not specifying the source of where it is being given to, on behalf of your neighbor.

    So, you would use the first one; the second one is wrong (so only the one with "to" is correct).

    And for the spelling of neighbor:

    Neighbor = English (U.S.)
    Neighbour = English (U.K)

    The British spelling, the one with the addition of the letter "u", is more internationally used. Yet, they are both correct spellings, just different variations of the English language.
     
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